A Deep Sense of Wrong: The Treason, Trials and Transportation to New South Wales of Lower Canadian Rebels

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Dundurn, Jan 11, 1995 - History - 368 pages
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In 1839 fifty-eight men left Montreal for the penal colony of New South Wales. They were ordinary people who had been caught up in the political whirlwind of the 1838 rebellion. Even though they were all civilians, they had been tried by court martial. Convicted of treason, their properties forfeited to the crown, they paid a heavy price for rebellion. And as convicts in Australia, they were considered the lowest of a bad lot. During their years there, however, they earned the respect of Sydney’s citizens.

 

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Contents

Treasons and Trials
45
ILLUSTRATIONS
159
Transportation and Life in New South Wales
161
The Conclusions
255
APPENDICES
293
ABBREVIATIONS
303
NOTES
304
SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY
353
INDEX
363
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Dr. Beverley Boissery is a historian and the author of three works of non-fiction: A Deep Sense of Wrong, Uncertain Justice, and Beyond Hope. Her children’s novel Sophie’s Rebellion was released in 25 to critical acclaim. Boissery lives in Vancouver with her quiet cat and rambunctious friends.

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