A Deleuzian Approach to Curriculum: Essays on a Pedagogical Life

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Palgrave Macmillan, Dec 15, 2010 - Education - 230 pages
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This work examines the impoverished image of life presupposed by the legacy of transcendent and representational thinking that continues to frame the limits of curricular thought. Analyzing the ways in which modern institutions colonize desire and overdetermine the life of its subject, this book draws upon the anti-Oedipal philosophy of Gilles Deleuze, revolutionary artistic practice, and an unorthodox curriculum genealogy to rethink the pedagogical project as a task of concept creation for the liberation of life and instantiation of a people yet to come. This book invites academics, artists, and graduate students to engage the contemporary struggles of curriculum theory, educational philosophy, and pedagogical practice with a new set of conceptual tools for thinking radical difference.

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Contents

The Illusion of Transcendence and the Ontology of Immanence
15
Powers of the False and the Problematics of the Simulacrum
29
BecomingNomad
43
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Jason J. Wallin is Assistant Professor of Media and Youth Culture Studies in Curriculum at the University of Alberta, where he teaches courses in visual culture, media technology, and curriculum theory. Focusing on the ethical and ontological significance of ‘anomaly’ in education, Jason’s published writing has appeared in such venues as the Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies, the Alberta Journal of Educational Research, Teaching Education, Journal of Curriculum Theorizing, and the Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies. Jason was co-editor of Democratizing Educational Experience (Educator’s International Press, 2008), a collection devoted to rethinking the notion of democracy in curriculum theory. In 2009, Jason received the Graduate Student Teaching Award from the University of Alberta for teaching excellence and is the recipient of the 2009 Elliot Eisner Doctoral Research Award in Art Education. In addition to this work, Jason is a widely published graphic designer, sound artist, and amateur animator.

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