A Devil's Triangle: Terrorism, Weapons of Mass Destruction, and Rogue States

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Rowman & Littlefield, 2007 - Political Science - 257 pages
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The bad news is that with the end of the Cold War, threats to international peace and security became less predictable and more diverse. The rise of international terrorism, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and ballistic missiles, and the troubling actions of rogue states replaced the US-USSR superpower rivalry as the central organizing theme of the new national security environment. The idea of a 'peace dividend, ' consisting of years of international tranquility and stability, were dashed on September 11, 2001. The threats of the Cold War were supplanted by new national security environment characterized by unpredictable, motivated, capable adversaries posing multiple threats. Peter Brookes, one of the most respected national security experts in the United States, reminds Americans that the world continues to be a very dangerous place, filled with people and groups eager to topple the United States. This devil's triangle-the intersection of terrorism, Chemical/Biological/ Radioactive/Nuclear weapons, and state sponsors-raises the timely question, What should America do about these new security challenges? America is at war and there is no other course but action. The United States can face these threats squarely and emerge victorious if we have the will and resolve to carry it through. Terrorism can be defeated. Proliferation can be curtailed. The behavior of rogue states can be modified. The United States is in an epic struggle in the defense of freedom and our way of life. A failure to identify, understand, and meet these security challenges head on could lead to an incident that would make the unspeakable horrors of 9/11 seem like a minor tragedy. With resolve, determination and a willingness to lead, America will successfully meet these challenges, and freedom will prevail.
 

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Contents

THE TERRORIST SCOURGE
9
BIRTHING MODERN TERROR
21
TRADECRAFT TARGETS TACTICS AND TOOLS
33
COLLECTING CASH AND RECRUITS
49
ALQAEDA TERROR CENTRAL
65
TERROR HOT SPOTS
79
GLOBAL TERROR INC
93
TACKLING TERRORISM
107
SPECTER OF SUPERTERRORISM
161
PREVENTING PROLIFERATION
177
IRAN MULLAHS OF MAYHEM
191
NORTH KOREA NUKES R US
203
SYRIA BAATHISTS BEHAVING BADLY
215
ROLLING BACK ROGUES
227
CONCLUSION
241
INDEX
245

SPREADING SUPER WEAPONS
123
MUSHROOM CLOUDS AND MISSILES
135
GAS AND BUGS
147

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Page 7 - Churchill said of another triumph for freedom — "is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end. But it is perhaps, the end of the beginning.
Page 5 - Today, the gravest danger in the war on terror, the gravest danger facing America and the world, is outlaw regimes that seek and possess nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons. These regimes could use such weapons for blackmail, terror, and mass murder. They could also give or sell those weapons to terrorist allies, who would use them without the least hesitation.
Page ix - Writing a book is an adventure; to begin with it is a toy and an amusement, then it becomes a mistress, and then it becomes a master, and then it becomes a tyrant, and the last phase is that just as you are about to be reconciled to your servitude, you kill the monster and fling him about to the public.

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About the author (2007)

Peter Brookes is a senior fellow for National Security Affairs and Director of the Asian Studies Center at the Heritage Foundation. He also has a weekly column on foreign policy and defense issues for the New York Post. He has served as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Asian and Pacific Affairs in the Office of Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld and was a Republican staffer on the House Committee on International Relations. Brookes also served as an Intelligence Officer with the CIAOs Directorate of Operations and worked on international economic issues for the State Department at the United Nations. His military background included active duty in Iraq/Kuwait (Desert Storm); Haiti (Restore Democracy); and Bosnia (Joint Endeavor). He flew reconnaissance missions in East Asia and the Persian Gulf while stationed in Japan covering military matters related to the Soviet Union, North Korea, China, Vietnam, Iran, and Iraq. While serving in Panama, he worked Latin American and Caribbean counter-narcotics and issues related to insurgencies/counter-insurgencies in Nicaragua and El Salvador. Brookes is also a Commander in the Naval Reserves and is assigned to the Defense Intelligence Agency where he serves as an Associated Professor in the Masters-level Postgraduate Intelligence Program at the Joint Military Intelligence College. He has also performed reserve assignments as a staff officer, defense attachZ, intelligence analyst and collector, and interpreter/translator with the Joint Chiefs of Staff, unified and specified commands, the Office of the Secretary of Defense, the Office of Naval Intelligence, the National Security Agency, the Defense Intelligence Agency, the Office of the Vice President and in support of the National Security Council. His military decorations include: the Joint Service Commendation Medal; the Navy Commendation Medal; the Navy Achievement Medal; several naval and joint unit awards; the Defense Language InstituteOs Kellogg Award; the Joint Chiefs of Staff service badge; and Naval Aviation Observer wings. Brookes is a graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy; the Defense Language Institute; the Naval War College; Georgetown University; and the Johns Hopkins University. In January 2006 he was named to the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission.

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