A Dictionary of Modern English Usage

Front Cover
Wordsworth Editions, 1994 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 742 pages
guide to precise phrases, grammar, and pronunciation can be key; it can even be admired. But beloved? Yet from its first appearance in 1926, Fowler's was just that. Henry Watson Fowler initially aimed his Dictionary of Modern English Usage, as he wrote to his publishers in 1911, at "the half-educated Englishman of literary proclivities who wants to know Can I say so-&-so?" He was of course obsessed with, in Swift's phrase, "proper words in their proper places." But having been a schoolmaster, Fowler knew that liberal doses of style, wit, and caprice would keep his manual off the shelf and in writers' hands. He also felt that description must accompany prescription, and that advocating pedantic "superstitions" and "fetishes" would be to no one's advantage. Adepts will have their favorite inconsequential entries--from burgle to brood, truffle to turgid. Would that we could quote them all, but we can't resist a couple.
 

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Contents

onto
44
otherwise
53
fail
59
ought
108
False quantity
120
Talse scent
147
out
166
fellow
174
Haziness
407
pace
418
Pansive disturbances Retro
426
help
466
hope
474
ible
503
Person
507
phile
515

feve
208
our or
218
fied
261
Foreign danger
276
For forc
293
Full stop
299
Grand compounds
306
Greek
315
Hackneyed phrases Jingles
341
half
355
hardly
370
Out of the fryingpan Recessive accent Superstitions
398
have
400
Pleonasma
521
Polysyllabic humour Sentence
550
ical
572
Pomposities
577
ics
646
Popularized technical shall will
664
Possessive puzzles s incongruous
672
Presumptuous word some
679
Pride of knowledge
694
Pronouns
709
provided
720
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