A Dictionary of Music and Musicians (A.D. 1450-1880) by Eminent Writers, English and Foreign, Volume 1

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George Grove
Macmillan, 1880 - Music
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OCLC Number: 19025639
Subjects
Music -- Dictionaries.
Music -- Bio-bibliography.
LCCN:ML 

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Page 442 - From harmony, from heavenly harmony This universal frame began: From harmony to harmony Through all the compass of the notes it ran, The diapason closing full in Man.
Page 226 - Lancashire, of which county he was a magistrate and deputy-lieutenant, and in 1870 he received the honorary degree of DCL from the University of Oxford.
Page 325 - ... for the comforting of such that delight in music, it may be permitted that in the beginning or in the end of common prayers, either at morning or evening, there may be sung an hymn or such - like song to the praise of Almighty God, in the best sort of melody and music that may be conveniently devised, having respect that the sentence of the hymn may be understanded and perceived.
Page 169 - I am that which is. I am all that is, that was, and that shall be. No mortal man hath lifted my veil. He is alone by Himself, and to Him alone do all things owe their being.
Page 209 - I hope I may be forgiven, that I have not made my opera throughout unnatural, like those in vogue; for I have no recitative...
Page 310 - prentice, making holiday with his sweetheart, treated her with a sight of Bedlam, the puppet-shows, the flying-chairs, and all the elegancies of Moorfields; from whence, proceeding to the Farthing Pye-house, he gave her a collation of buns, cheesecakes, gammon of bacon, stuffed beef, and bottled ale ; through all which scenes the author dodged them (charmed with the simplicity of their courtship), from whence he drew this little sketch of Nature...
Page 460 - twixt thee and me, Because thou lov'st the one and I the other. Dowland to thee is dear, whose heavenly touch Upon the lute, doth ravish human sense; Spenser to me, whose deep conceit is such As passing all conceit, needs no defence. Thou lov'st to hear the sweet melodious sound That Phoebus...
Page 309 - Betty; or, The Country Bumpkins, which met with a cold reception. In 33 he wrote and composed a musical entertainment called 'Cephalus and Procris," which was produced at Drury Lane Theatre with a pantomime interlude entitled ' Harlequin Volgi.' On Feb. 22, 1734, he produced at the Haymarket Theatre ' The most Tragical Tragedy that ever was Tragedized by any Company of Tragedians...
Page 412 - Tell' in Paris. In a letter to his wife, written, on j.he very first night of performance, Weber says, ' My dear Lina, Thanks to God and to his all powerful will I obtained this evening the greatest success of my life. The emotion produced by such a triumph is more than I can describe. To God alone belongs the glory. When I entered the orchestra, the house, crammed to the roof, burst into a frenzy of applause. Hats and handkerchiefs were waved in the air. The overture had to be executed twice, as...
Page 71 - ... accompanying the organ, was introduced a concert of twenty-four violins between every pause, after the French fantastical light way, better suiting a tavern, or playhouse, than a church. This was the first time of change, and now we no more heard the cornet which gave life to the organ ; that instrument quite left off in which the English were so skilful.

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