A Dirty Business

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Cliffhanger Press, Sep 27, 2010 - Fiction - 168 pages
4 Reviews
When Kevin Bailey, a black, jobless twenty-something returns to New York City from a recent hermitage in the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina, he finds himself both broke and homeless. Armed with a degree in criminal justice, he immediately leans on an associate and former employer for a needed job referral. This leads to a position with the Frank Givens detective agency in Midtown. Bailey is hired for various reasons, three of which are the fact that he comes cheap, he's green enough to be taught, and his boss is swamped with cases. Frank Givens tosses Bailey a case that should have been fairly routine: a New York City socialite requires dirt on her son's fianc e based on her suspicions of gold digging.
After the client, Selena Eldritch, supplies Bailey with a photo of her son Edward Eldritch and his blonde fianc e, Donna Greenwood, the investigation is underway, and Bailey eventually tails Edward Eldritch to a quaint historical village hours outside of Manhattan. There, Edward meets with a brunette, and Bailey soon follows the pair into a local tavern where he then discovers that the brunette's name is in fact Donna Greenwood. Who, then, is the blonde in the photo? And why does Selena Eldritch believe her to be Donna Greenwood? Bailey sets out to uncover the truth behind this mystery, but as he begins to dig deeper, he soon learns a few intriguing facts. The blonde in the photo, Norma Vidon, has actually been missing for quite some time, and the police have even given up their investigation into her disappearance.
Baily continues to dig even further, uncovering weird obsessions, betrayals, and not a little deceit and, of course, dead bodies begin turning up. What started out as an average, relatively simple assignment soon develops into a complex case full of pretzel twists; one difficult enough for Kevin Baily to truly prove himself. But he is up to the task?
 

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User Review  - aplazar - LibraryThing

A Dirty Business, the new debut crime novel by Joe Humphrey, goes down smooth and easy, like a slug of Chivas Regal on the rocks. Kevin Bailey, a young black man recently returned to New York from a ... Read full review

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I like how the style of the character in the book is portrayed.Author Joe Humphrey introuduces us(the reader) to Kevin Bailey a typical guy who seeking a job,and a place to stay,the job he ends up getting is of PI(private investigator) work.Kevin very first case takes him all over the city of New York as well as the suburbs,and into Pennsylvania.He finds out there's more to being a PI than he thought.He gets hired for one case,and ends up solving a missing person,and seeking some info on a murder in which are tied into the original case he was hired to do.The Author is very descriptive in his writing style of the places Kevin Bailey has to go to to get info.Also I like how the author writes in detail of what the character(s) are doing as though your watching,I mean reading the character(s) play by play moves in the story.That just intensified the plot of the story even more,but be forewarned you have to read the book in its entirety to keep up with each characters that ties into the case Kevin is trying to solve.Oh! and please don't jump to any conclusion in thinking you are solving the case as you read along as Kevin is set out to do,because the author put a twist in there that you didn't see coming.A DIRTY BUSINESS it's just what it meant, because reading it you might think you KNOW how it turns out,but Kevin Bailey is the PI who ends up solving the case.A MUST READ!!!!  

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
8
Section 3
13
Section 4
18
Section 5
26
Section 6
31
Section 7
36
Section 8
41
Section 14
88
Section 15
93
Section 16
100
Section 17
108
Section 18
117
Section 19
124
Section 20
129
Section 21
136

Section 9
47
Section 10
54
Section 11
63
Section 12
72
Section 13
81
Section 22
142
Section 23
146
Section 24
158
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