A Dissertation on the Freedom of Navigation and Maritime Commerce, and Such Rights of States, Relative Thereto, as are Founded on the Law of Nations: Adapted More Particularly to the United States; and Interspersed with Moral and Political Reflections, and Historical Facts : with an Appendix, Containing Sundry State Papers

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The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd., 1802 - Law - 339 pages
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Barton, William. [1754-1817]. A Dissertation on the Freedom of Navigation and Maritime Commerce, and Such Rights of States, Relative Thereto, as Are Founded On the Law of Nations: Adapted More Particularly to the United States; and Interspersed with Moral and Political Reflections, and Historical facts. With An Appendix, Containing Sundry State Papers. Philadelphia: John Conrad and Company, 1802. 339, xlv, [3] pp. Octavo. Reprint available April 2005 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. 1-58477-509-2. Cloth. $110. * Reprint of the first and only edition. Barton admired Thomas Jefferson and dedicated this book to him. Jefferson was pleased by this honor: "Accept my best wishes for the success of your work and assurances of my high esteem and respect" (Sowerby). One of the earliest works of its kind, Barton presents an American interpretation of maritime law affecting freedom of navigation and the rights of neutral merchant vessels during times of war. Barton uses a broad overview of international law and treaties of the Washington and Adams administrations to criticize English interference with American shipping and the impressment of sailors. This volume offers a contemporary interpretation of the actions that would lead to the Non-Intercourse and Embargo Acts (1807, 1809) and, in the following administration, the War of 1812. Sowerby, Catalogue of the Library of Thomas Jefferson II: 373-374. Cohen, Bibliography of Early American Law 7447. Sabin, A Dictionary of Books Relating to America 3853.
 

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Contents

II
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IV
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V
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VII
i
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xlvi
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Page 61 - That all men are born equally free and independent, and have certain natural, inherent and unalienable rights; amongst which are the enjoying and defending life and liberty, acquiring, possessing and protecting property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety...

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