A False Sense of Well Being

Front Cover
Random House Publishing Group, Oct 1, 2002 - Fiction - 400 pages
3 Reviews
WINNER OF THE GEORGIA AUTHOR OF THE YEAR AWARD FOR FIRST NOVEL

“Braselton’s confident first novel is [a] depiction of love on the rocks in the New South that combines small town charm with major league angst. . . . A down-home Proustian recherché search . . . [An] entertaining, rueful account of an apparently ‘normal’ marriage.”
–Los Angeles Times

“Simply extraordinary. [This novel] has the wit and modern comedy of Nora Ephron and the literary force of Flannery O’Connor.”
–KAYE GIBBONS
Author of Ellen Foster

At thirty-eight, Jessie Maddox has a comfortable life in Glenville, Georgia, with the most responsible husband in the world. But after the storybook romance, “happily ever after” never came. Now Jessie is left to wonder: Why can’t she stop picturing herself as the perfect grieving widow? As Jessie dives headlong into her midlife crisis, she is joined by a colorful cast of eccentrics. There’s her best friend Donna, who is having a wild adulterous affair with a younger man; Wanda McNabb, the sweet-natured grandmother who is charged with killing her husband; Jessie’s younger sister Ellen, who was born to be a guest on Jerry Springer; their mother, who persistently crosses the dirty words out of library books; and of course the stuffed green headless duck. . . .

When a trip home to the small town of her childhood raises more questions than it answers, Jessie is forced to face the startling truth head-on–and confront the tragedy that has shadowed her heart and shaken her faith in love . . . and the future.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - MarieAlt - LibraryThing

A well-written novel, with a strong first-person voice—unfortunately, not a voice I wanted to spend so much time with. A False Sense of Well Being is a character driven novel in the traditional sense ... Read full review

Review: A False Sense of Well Being

User Review  - Maeta - Goodreads

Picked it up at a dollar store. Read it over the weekend. One of the kind of books that I don't mind getting interrupted while reading. Characters were shallow and the plot lame. Would not suggest it to anyone. Read full review

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About the author (2002)

Jeanne Braselton was born and raised in Georgia. She is the adopted daughter of a poet who was designated chief of the Cherokee Nation. While working as a journalist for the Rome News Tribune, she won numerous Georgia Press Association awards. A False Sense of Well-Being is her first novel.


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