A Field Guide to Conservation Finance

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Island Press, Sep 26, 2012 - Nature - 408 pages
Finally, a comprehensive book on land conservation financing for community and regional conservation leaders. A Field Guide to Conservation Finance provides essential advice on how to tackle the universal obstacle to protecting private land in America: lack of money. Story Clark dispels the myths that conservationists can access only private funds controlled by individuals or that only large conservation organizations have clout with big capital markets. She shows how small land conservation organizations can achieve conservation goals using both traditional and cutting-edge financial strategies. Clark outlines essential tools for raising money, borrowing money, and reducing the cost of transactions. She covers a range of subjects including transfer fees, voluntary surcharges, seller financing, revolving funds, and Project Related Investment programs (PRIs). A clear, well-written overview of the basics of conservation finance with useful insights and real stories combine to create a book that is an invaluable and accessible guide for land trusts seeking to protect more land.
 

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Contents

Raising Money
91
Borrowing Money
179
Looking Ahead
297
How It Could Come Together in the Future
329
Appendix
337
Glossary
349
Notes
357
Bibliography
371
About the Author
375
Index
377
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Story Clark is a consultant specializing in land conservation strategy and finance, advising conservation organizations and foundations in the Rocky Mountain Region and elsewhere. She has worked in land conservation and land use planning for over 25 years in association with (among others) the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Jackson Hole Land Trust, and as a county planner for Teton County. Ms. Clark currently serves on boards or advisory boards that include: the American Conservation Association, Conservation International, Ruckelshaus Institute for Environment and Natural Resources at the University of Wyoming, the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences at Duke University, the Wyoming Stockgrowers Agricultural Land Trust, the Tuckernuck Land Trust, and the Lady Bird Johnson Award Jury. She recently retired from the board of the Land Trust Alliance after serving two terms. She is a frequent speaker and instructor at land conservation conferences. She lives with her husband and two daughters on their family ranch in Jackson Hole, Wyoming.

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