A Field Guide to Sprawl

Front Cover
W. W. Norton & Company, 2004 - Architecture - 128 pages
5 Reviews
Duck, ruburb, tower farm, big box, and pig-in-a-python are among the dozens of zany terms invented by real estate developers and designers today to characterize land-use practices and the physical elements of sprawl. Sprawl in the environment, based on the metaphor of a person spread out, is hard to define. This concise book engages its meaning, explains common building patterns, and illustrates the visual culture of sprawl. Seventy-five stunning color aerial photographs, each paired with a definition, convey the impact of excessive development. This "engagingly organized and splendidly photographed" (Wall Street Journal) book provides the verbal and visual vocabulary needed by professionals, public officials, and citizens to critique uncontrolled growth in the American landscape.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - FredB - LibraryThing

A quick read. This is a picture book of things you might see in a typical sprawling suburb, with some clever terminology. For example, a LULU is a "Locally Unwanted Land Use". This could refer to a ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - vpfluke - LibraryThing

This books was both fun to look through and educative to read. Through the use of aerial photographs, it shows how the landscape in the United States has been changed through sprawl. Each photograph ... Read full review

Contents

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7
II
8
III
10
IV
12
V
13
VI
16
VII
17
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About the author (2004)

Dolores Hayden, professor of architecture and American studies at Yale, writes about the politics of design.

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