A First Book of Morphy

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Trafford Publishing, 2004 - Games - 213 pages
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A First Book of Morphy aims to illustrate the teachings of three great chessplayers with games played by the first American chess champion, Paul Morphy. The book presents more than 60 of Morphy's brilliant and instructive games in demonstration of basic chess principles written by grandmasters Reuben Fine and Cecil Purdy.

 

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Contents

Introduction
7
The Opening
11
Ten Opening Rules
12
Open with a center pawn
13
Develop with threats
21
Develop knights before bishops
29
Dont move the same piece twice in the opening if you can help it
35
Make as few pawn moves as possible in the opening
39
Dont expose your king while the enemy queen is still on the board
113
All combinations are based on a double attack
119
When your opponent has one or more pieces exposed look for a combination
123
To attack the enemy king open a file or less often a diagonal to gain access for the heavy pieces
127
Centralize the action of your pieces
135
The best defense is a counterattack
143
The Endgame
147
Ten Endgame Rules
148

Dont bring your queen out too early
45
Castle as soon as possible preferably on the kingside
49
Play to get control of the center
55
Play to maintain at least one pawn in the center
63
Dont sacrifice without a clear and adequate reason
67
The Middlegame
77
Ten Middlegame Rules
78
Have all your moves fit into a definite plan
79
When ahead in material exchange as many pieces as possible especially queens
89
Avoid doubled isolated and backward pawns
95
In cramped positions free yourself by exchanging
109
To win without pawns you must be a rook or two minor pieces ahead two knights excepted
149
The king must be active in the endgame
153
Passed pawns must be pushed
157
The easiest endings to win are pure pawn endings
161
When one pawn ahead exchange pieces not pawns
169
Dont place pawns on the same color squares as your bishop
175
Bishops are better than knights in all but blocked pawn positions
183
It is worth a pawn to get a rook on the seventh rank with four or more pawns
189
Rooks belong behind passed pawns
199
Blockade passed pawns with the king
207
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About the author (2004)

Frisco Del Rosario is a chess teacher and writer. He edited the California Chess Journal from 2001 to 2003, when the magazine won national awards for analysis and general excellence. He resides in San Mateo, Calif., where he writes about basketball for a local newspap

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