A Fishing Life Is Hard Work

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Stackpole Books, 2003 - Sports & Recreation - 159 pages
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Author tells how he became disenchanted with fishing when he began working in the business, and how his humor and his love of time spent alone fishing whatever water was nearby brought back his appreciation for the simple joys of fishing for fun.
 

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A fishing life is hard work

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An old chestnut often uttered by freelance writers maintains that "those who can, write; those who can't, edit." If so, Scheck is the exception who proves the rule, for most of his career he has ... Read full review

Contents

The Art of DeCeptioN
13
ALwaYs GreeNer
23
Two Tips from the Pros
31
What I LearNeD at Camp
41
A Taste of VirtuaL BLooD
47
FishiNg SChoOL
55
IXNAY THE ATINLAY
67
A BeatifiC VisioN
85
MaCKereL Jigs
105
A Box of Hope
119
SKetChes of NoteworthY ANgLers
127
PeNs for Hire
143
EveNiNgs iN JuNe
153
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Page xi - He had discovered a great law of human action, without knowing it— namely, that in order to make a man or boy covet a thing, it is only necessary to make the thing difficult to attain.
Page xi - Work consists of whatever a body is obliged to do, and that Play consists of whatever a body is not obliged to do. And this would help him to understand why constructing artificial flowers or performing on a tread-mill is work, while rolling tenpins or climbing Mont Blanc is only amusement. There are wealthy gentlemen in England who drive four-horse passenger-coaches twenty or thirty miles on a daily line, in the summer, because the privilege costs them considerable money; but if they were offered...
Page xi - Tom said to himself that it was not such a hollow world, after all. He had discovered a great law of human action, without knowing it namely, that in order to make a man or a boy covet a thing, it is only necessary to make the thing difficult to attain. If he had been a great and wise philosopher, like the writer of this book...
Page xi - ... boy covet a thing, it is only necessary to make the thing difficult to attain. If he had been a great and wise philosopher, like the writer of this book, he would now have comprehended that Work consists of whatever a body is obliged to do, and that Play consists of whatever a body is not obliged to do. And this would help him to understand why constructing artificial flowers or performing on a tread-mill is work, while rolling tenpins or climbing Mont Blanc is only amusement.

About the author (2003)

Art Scheck is the editor of Saltwater Fly Fishing and a freelance writer and editor. He lives in Anderson, South Carolina.

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