A Forgotten Sisterhood: Pioneering Black Women Educators and Activists in the Jim Crow South

Front Cover
Rowman & Littlefield, Oct 30, 2014 - History - 200 pages
Emerging from the darkness of the slave era and Reconstruction, black activist women Lucy Craft Laney, Mary McLeod Bethune, Charlotte Hawkins Brown, and Nannie Helen Burroughs founded schools aimed at liberating African-American youth from disadvantaged futures in the segregated and decidedly unequal South. From the late nineteenth through mid-twentieth centuries, these individuals fought discrimination as members of a larger movement of black women who uplifted future generations through a focus on education, social service, and cultural transformation. Born free, but with the shadow of the slave past still implanted in their consciousness, Laney, Bethune, Brown, and Burroughs built off each other’s successes and learned from each other’s struggles as administrators, lecturers, and suffragists. Drawing from the women’s own letters and writings about educational methods and from remembrances of surviving students, Audrey Thomas McCluskey reveals the pivotal significance of this sisterhood’s legacy for later generations and for the institution of education itself.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The World They Inherited
1
Moving Like a Whirlwind
15
The Best Secondary School in Georgia
37
Ringing Up a School
55
Show Some Daylight Between You
73
Telling Some Mighty Truths
101
The Masses and the Classes
117
Passing into History
141
Milestones and Legacies
159
Bibliography
165
Special Collections
171
Index
173
About the Author
181
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2014)

Audrey Thomas McCluskey is professor emerita in the Department of African-American & African Diaspora Studies at Indiana University. She served alternately as director of the Neal-Marshall Black Culture Center and director of the Black Film Center/ Archive. Her publications on black women educators include several journal articles, book chapters, and the coedited book, Mary McLeod Bethune: Building a Better World.

Bibliographic information