A Garden of My Own: Australian Gardeners' Stories

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Allen & Unwin, 2003 - Gardening - 259 pages
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45 Australian gardeners share their stories of passion and persistence in creating their own special places. Previously published as the coffee table book, 'The Open Garden'.;;;
 

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Contents

I woolongoon 12 I cherry tree
18
cooramilla 61 I michael mccoys garden
66
tugurium j I dennis richardsons garden
81
hundscheidts garden 100 I waterfall cottage
106
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Page 53 - If you wish to be happy for a day, get drunk. If you wish to be happy for a week, kill a pig. If you wish to be happy for a month, get married. But if you wish to be happy for ever and ever, make a garden.
Page 250 - ... of materialism ; and since the inadequacy of materialism has become apparent in social and economic theory, its influence has declined. But coming when it did, the doctrine had historic value. In the days before 1914 the idle rich, who then really did exist as a class, used to eat and drink too much for eleven months of the year, and then for one month they took what was known as a cure in order to remove adipose tissue and reduce curves. This cure was purely negative. It consisted simply of...
Page 75 - It's amazing what you can get away with if you say it with conviction.

About the author (2003)

Neil Robertson has been involved in Australia's Open Garden Scheme in one capacity or another since 1988, and was one of the chief architects of its national expansion. He has been the Scheme's National Executive Officer since 1990. In an earlier life, Neil was a bookseller in Australia and England and for a time was the owner of Webbers Booksellers, one of Australia's most respected bookshops. As well as a stint writing a weekly gardening article for the Melbourne Herald, Neil has contributed to many other gardening journals...He is a dedicated gardener - his own garden Westport at New Gisborne opens regularly for the Scheme - and when not armed with trowel and secateurs is to be found ensconced with a good book in his library...Louise Earwaker trained as a journalist, then became an editor with Time-Life Books in London. In the 1980s she moved to Tasmania and since 1993 has been Tasmanian co-ordinator of Australia's Open Garden Scheme. As a garden writer and photo

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