A General History of Voyages and Travels to the End of the 18th Century, Volume 11

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J. Ballantyne & Company, 1814
 

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Page 63 - Netherlands, with the exclusive privilege to traffic and plant colonies on the coast of Africa from the Tropic of Cancer to the Cape of Good Hope ; on the coast of America, from the straits of Magellan to the remotest north.
Page 300 - ... have at that time raised in them, can judge of the emotion with which we eyed a large cascade of the most transparent water, which poured itself from a rock near a hundred feet high into the sea, at a small distance from the ship. Even those amongst the diseased who were not in the very last stages of the distemper, though they had been long confined to their hammocks, exerted the small remains of strength that were left them, and crawled up to the deck to feast themselves with this reviving...
Page 447 - Commodore ; who, on hearing this happy and unexpected news, threw down his axe with which he was then at work, and by his joy broke through for the first time the equable and unvaried character which he had hitherto preserved. The others who were with him instantly ran down to the seaside in a kind of frenzy, eager to feast themselves with a sight they had so ardently wished for, and of which they had now for a considerable time despaired.
Page 486 - ... into the Centurion. The last of these operations was too important to be postponed ; for as the navigation to Canton was through seas but little known, and where, from the season of the year, much bad weather might be expected, it was of great consequence that the treasure should be sent on board the Centurion, which ship, by the presence of the...
Page 220 - Wager too joined in opinion with the commodore, that invalids were no ways proper for this service, and solicited strenuously to have them exchanged: but he was told that persons who were supposed to be better judges of soldiers than he or Mr. Anson, thought them the properest men that could be employed on this occasion.
Page 487 - ... were strangely metamorphosed by the heat of the hold ; for when they were first taken, they were sightly robust fellows ; but when, after above a month's imprisonment, they were discharged in the river of Canton, they were reduced to mere skeletons $ and their air and looks corresponded much more to the conception formed of ghosts and spectres, than to the figure and appearance of real men.
Page 315 - Island but as we soon lost sight of her, and she did not appear for near a week, we were prodigiously concerned, knowing that she must be again in extreme distress for want of water. After great impatience about her, we...
Page 315 - ... had it not been for the last supply sent by our long-boat, both the healthy and diseased must have all perished together for want of water. And these calamities were the more terrifying, as they appeared to be without remedy : for the Gloucester had already spent a month in her endeavours to fetch the bay, and she was now no farther advanced than at the first moment she made the island...
Page 368 - ... the treasure then in the town, and who, with a few others had ranged themselves in a gallery that ran round the governor's house, yet that post was immediately abandoned upon the first fire made by our people, who were thereby left in quiet possession of the parade. ' On this success lieutenant Brett divided his men into two parties, ordering one of them to surround the governor's house, and if possible to secure the governor, whilst he himself with the other marched to the fort, with an intent...
Page 300 - The aspect of this country, thus diversified, would at all times have been extremely delightful ; but in our distressed situation, languishing as we were for the land and its vegetable productions (an inclination constantly attending every stage of the sea-scurvy), it is scarcely credible with what eagerness and transport we viewed the shore...

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