A General History of Voyages and Travels to the End of the 18th Century, Volume 12

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J. Ballantyne & Company, 1814
 

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Page 104 - It had been better to give the sentence another turn, and to say, " It took its rise, perhaps, more from the ignorance of the scholars than from the knowledge of the masters." I shall add the improper use of the word surfeit in the following quotation .from Anson's Voyage round the World: " We thought it prudent totally to abstain from fish, the few we caught at our first arrival having surfeited those who ate of...
Page 418 - They appeared to be tall, and to have heads remarkably large; perhaps they had something wound round them, which we could not distinguish ; they were of a copper colour, and had long black hair. Eleven of them walked along the beach abreast of the ship, with poles or pikes in their hands, which reached twice as high as themselves. While they walked on the beach they seemed to be naked ; but soon after...
Page 476 - ... forward. Tubourai Tamaide uttered something, which was supposed to be a prayer, near the body ; and did the same when he came up to his own house : when this was done, the procession was continued towards the fort, permission having been obtained to approach it upon this occasion. It is the custom of the Indians to fly from these processions with the utmost precipitation, so that as soon as those who were about the fort saw it at a distance they hid themselves in the woods. It proceeded from...
Page 396 - ... themselves and the strangers, which was considered as the renunciation of weapons in token of peace : They then walked briskly towards their companions, who had halted at about fifty yards behind them, and beckoned the gentlemen to follow, which they did. They were received with many uncouth signs of friendship; and, in return, they distributed among them some beads and ribbons, which had been brought on shore for that purpose, and with which they were greatly delighted. A mutual confidence and...
Page 404 - ... portions, and every man cooked his own as he thought fit. After this repast, which furnished each of them with about three mouthfuls, they prepared to set out ; but it was ten o'clock before the snow was sufficiently gone off to render a march practicable. After a walk of about three hours, they were...
Page 466 - Oberea could be persuaded to take any measure for that purpose, so that we began to suspect that they had been parties in the theft. About eight o'clock, we were joined by Dr Solander, who had fallen into honester hands, at a house about a mile distant, and had lost nothing.
Page 394 - Having continued to range the coast on the 14th, we entered the Streight of Le Maire ; but the tide turning against us, drove us out with great violence, and raised such a sea off Cape St Diego, that the waves had exactly the same appearance as they would have had if they had broke over a ledge of rocks ; and when the ship was in this torrent, she frequently pitched, so that the bowsprit was under water. About noon, we got under the land between Cape St...
Page 381 - Velasco, who with great politeness offered to take our letters to Europe : I accepted the favour, and gave him a packet for the secretary of the Admiralty, containing copies of all the papers that had passed between me and the viceroy; leaving also duplicates with the viceroy, to be by him forwarded to Lisbon. On Monday the 5th, it being a dead calm, we Weighed anchor and towed down the bay ; but, to our great astonishment, when we got abreast of Santa Cruz, the principal fortification, two shot...
Page 422 - ... gratify an idle curiosity ; especially as we expected soon to fall in with the island where we had been directed to make our astronomical observation, the inhabitants of which would probably admit us without opposition, as they were already acquainted with our strength, and might also procure usa ready and peaceable reception among the neighbouring people, if we should desire it.
Page 481 - ... being placed at the bottom, were covered with green leaves. The dog, with the entrails, was then placed upon the leaves, and other leaves being laid upon them, the whole was covered with the rest of the hot stones, and the mouth of the hole close stopped with mould. In somewhat less than four hours it was again opened, and the dog taken out excellently baked ; and we all agreed that he had made a very good dish.

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