A General View of the Criminal Law of England

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The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd., Dec 1, 2004 - History - 499 pages
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Stephen, Sir James Fitzjames. A General View of the Criminal Law of England. London and Cambridge: Macmillan and Co., 1863. xii, 499 pp. Reprint available February, 2005 The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. 1-58477-478-9. Cloth. $95. * Reprint of the first edition. Stephen [1829-1894] explores English law exclusive of penal actions, of offences punishable by summary proceedings before magistrates and of special offences intended as sanctions for special statutory institutions but including all other acts commonly known as crimes. In a discussion of a later edition Holdsworth observed: "it was probably the best modern history of a particular branch of English law that had yet appeared in England. It won high praise from Pollock and Maitland.... Though the more intensive study of the earlier history of our law has rendered some parts of it obsolete, it is still the best history of the later stages of the law. And it has another merit which it can never lose. The fact that its author was a practising lawyer and a judge, gives to his account of many parts of the law, and especially to his analysis of famous trials, the reality and vividness which comes of practical experience.": The Historians of Anglo-American Law 77-78.
 

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Page 36 - Queen, or of their eldest son and heir; or if a man do violate the King's companion, or the King's eldest daughter unmarried, or the wife of the King's eldest son and heir; or if a man do levy war against our lord the King in his realm, or be adherent to the King's enemies in his realm, giving to them aid and comfort in the realm, or elsewhere, and thereof be provably attainted of open deed by the people of their condition.
Page 36 - Heir ; or if a Man do violate the King's Companion, or the King's eldest Daughter unmarried, or the Wife of the King's Eldest Son and Heir ; or if a Man do levy War against our Lord the King...

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