A God Strolling in the Cool of the Evening: A Novel

Front Cover
Grove Press, 2000 - Fiction - 265 pages
3 Reviews
Winner of the Portuguese Writers' Association Grand Prize for Fiction and the Pegasus Prize for Literature, and a best-seller in Portugal, Mario de Carvalho's A God Strolling in the Cool of the Evening is a vivid and affecting historical novel set at the twilight of the Roman Empire and the dawn of the Christian era. Lucius Valerius Quintius is prefect of the fictitious city of Tarcisis, charged to defend it against menaces from without -- Moors invading the Iberian peninsula -- and from within -- the decadent complacency of the Pax Romana. Lucius's devotion to civic duty undergoes its most crucial test when Iunia Cantaber, the beautiful, charismatic leader of the outlawed Christian sect, is brought before his court. A God Strolling in the Cool of the Evening is a timeless story of an era beset by radical upheaval and a man struggling to reconcile his heart, his ethics, and his civic duty.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - janerawoof - LibraryThing

I first read this book in May this year [2013]. I just finished rereading it [July 2013] and I have increased the stars from 4 to 5. Languid. Thought-provoking. This novel takes place in the Roman ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - JoK - LibraryThing

First things first - _A God Strolling..._ was an engaging read. Previous reviewers have touched on the excellent development of setting and atmosphere, and I agree that de Carvalho pulls the reader ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

I
v
II
4
III
18
IV
28
V
41
VI
56
VII
70
VIII
86
XII
144
XIII
160
XIV
174
XV
186
XVI
197
XVII
208
XVIII
219
XIX
234

IX
102
X
118
XI
132
XX
251
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2000)

Gregory Rabassa was born in Yonkers, New York on March 9, 1922. He received a bachelor's degree in romance languages from Dartmouth College. During World War II, he served as a cryptographer. After the war, he received a doctorate from Columbia University and translated Spanish and Portuguese language works for the magazine Odyssey. He taught for over two decades at Columbia University before accepting a position at Queens College. He was a literary translator from Spanish and Portuguese to English. He would translate a book as he read it for the first time. He translated Gabriel Garcia Marquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude and The Autumn of the Patriarch, Mario Vargas Llosa's Conversation in the Cathedral, and Jorge Amado's Captains of the Sand. Rabassa received a National Book Award for Translation in 1967 for his version of Julio Cortázar's Hopscotch. In 2001, Rabassa received a lifetime achievement award from the PEN American Center for contributions to Hispanic literature. In 2006, he received a National Medal of Arts for translations which "continue to enhance our cultural understanding and enrich our lives." He wrote a memoir detailing his experiences as a translator entitled If This Be Treason: Translation and Its Dyscontents. He died after a brief illness on June 13, 2016 at the age of 94.

Bibliographic information