A Grammar of Mina

Front Cover
Walter de Gruyter, 2005 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 509 pages
0 Reviews

A Grammar of Mina is a reference grammar of a hitherto undescribed and endangered Central Chadic language. The book contains a description of the phonology, morphology, syntax, and all the functional domains encoded by this language. For each hypothesis regarding a form of linguistic expression and its function, ample evidence is given. The description of formal means and of the functions coded by these means is couched in terms accessible to all linguists regardless of their theoretical orientations.

The outstanding characteristics of Mina include: vowel harmony; use of phonological means, including vowel deletion and vowel retention, to code phrasal boundaries; two tense and aspectual systems, each system carrying a different pragmatic function; a lexical category 'locative predicator' hitherto not observed in other languages; some tense, aspect, and mood markers that occur before the verb, and others that occur after the verb; the markers of interrogative and negative modality that occur in clause-final position; the conjunction used for a conjoined noun phrase in the subject function that differs from the conjunction used for a conjoined noun phrase in all other functions.In addition to the coding of argument structure, adjuncts, tense, aspect, and mood categories, Mina also codes the category point-of-view. The language has a clausal category 'comment clause' used in both simple and complex sentences, which overtly marks the speaker's comment on the proposition. The discourse structure has the principle of unity of place. If one of the participants in a described event changes scene, that is coded by a special syntactic construction in addition to any verb of movement that may be used. Because of these unusual linguistic characteristics, the Grammar of Mina will be of interest to a wide range of linguists.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Phonology
7
The vowel system
17
Syllabification
24
Conclusions
32
Possessive pronouns
48
Attributive functions through the genitive marker
54
Plural formation
60
Coordinating construction through the associative
63
Coding the mood of obligation through possessive constructions
244
Comment clause
246
The endofevent marker in protasis clauses
254
Conclusions
260
Negation of the habitual
267
Verbless clauses
273
Plurality coding through reduplication
282
Questions about the truth with presuppositions
290

Coding of the exclusion of other participants
69
A nonproductive suffix u
75
Subject pronouns
81
Pleonastic subjects
91
Pronominal objects
97
Argument structure of verbs of emotional states
103
Coding reciprocity
114
Point of view of the subject and speakers empathy
121
Functions of coding means in locative predication
127
Genitive construction in the locative phrase
133
Prepositional form of pronouns
141
Preposition nddrj bottom inside
147
Adjuncts
155
Adverbs ya and ydm also
160
Adverbs of manner
166
Function of the goal orientation extension
173
Tenses
179
Independent past tense
188
Dependent past tense
194
Independent habitual
200
Perfect
211
The intentional aspect
218
Inceptive aspect
224
Imperative
231
Polite orders
237
Reference system
305
Full noun phrase as subject
312
Use of pronouns in reference system
315
The domain of known referent
323
The remote previous mention marker ndkdhd
334
Entity anaphor and switch reference
340
Focus constructions
347
Conclusions
355
Nonpropositional topics
362
Introduction
369
The propositional relator ko
378
Objecttoobject raising
397
Conclusions
403
Introduction
405
Conclusions
417
Comparative constructions
423
Relative clause
429
Relativization of possessor
435
Change of scene
441
Conclusions
451
The three men
459
A frog and a buffalo
491
Index
501
References
507
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2005)

Zygmunt Frajzyngier is Professor at the Department of Linguistics, University of Colorado at Boulder, USA.

Eric Johnston is affiliated with the Department of Linguistics, University of Colorado at Boulder, USA.

Bibliographic information