A Grammar of Qiang: With Annotated Texts and Glossary

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Walter de Gruyter, 2003 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 445 pages
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Qiang is a Tibeto-Burman language of southwest China, spoken by about 70,000 Qiang and Tibetan people in northern Sichuan Province. This book, the first book-length description of the Qiang language in English, includes not only the reference grammar, but also an ethnological overview, several fully analyzed texts (mostly traditional stories) and an annotated glossary. The language is verb final, and agglutinative (prefixing and suffixing), with a very complex phonological system and both head-marking and dependent marking morphology. It will be of use to typologists, comparativists, Sino-Tibetanists, anthropologists, and linguists in general.

 

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Contents

Chapter 1 Introduction
1
Chapter 2 The phonological system
21
Chapter 3 The noun phrase
39
Chapter 4 The verb complex
119
Chapter 5 The clause and complex structures
221
Texts
249
Text 1 The Creation of the World
251
Text 2 The Legend of the Origin of All Things
253
Text 4 Uncle Snake
269
Text 5 The Story of a Lazy Man
274
Text 6 The Old Man of the Chen Family
300
EnglishQiang glossary arranged by semantic field
329
Index to English glosses in glossary
389
Notes
421
References
433
Index to the grammar
442

Text 3 An Orphan
256

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About the author (2003)

Randy LaPolla is Associate Professor at the City University of Hong Kong.†

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