A Grammar of Speech

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Oxford University Press, 1995 - Philosophy - 264 pages
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This book provides an innovative analysis of English grammar in the spoken form. Hitherto, most grammars of English have relied heavily on the written language, and this excludes much normal spoken discourse. This work offers an alternative view of the structure of spoken English based on naturally-occurring language data. A Grammar of Speech has relevance for many areas related to linguistics, such as Artificial Intelligence, computational linguistics, and machinetranslation. First Prize English Speaking Union's Duke of Edinburgh Book Competition
 

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Contents

Product and process
10
Used language
24
Scholarly background
36
syntactic
42
Four and fiveelement chains
50
Sample of data
56
Suspension in simple chains
62
The relationship between elements
69
Nominal elements
151
Prenominal specification
159
Talk about talk
167
Illocutionary force
173
More talk about talk
179
Theme
187
Question types
195
What can go wrong?
203

Indeterminacy and ambiguity
71
Nonfinite verbal elements
84
Sample of data
100
Modals and the plain infinitive
113
Verbal element do
119
Same or different referent?
127
Zero realization in finite second predications
133
Open selectors
139
Selection by predication
145
constraints
209
A linear analysis
215
Uses of a linear account of grammar
222
A users model?
228
Language learning and teaching
234
Appendix
240
Glossary
247
Bibliography
256
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