A Grammar of Tukang Besi

Front Cover
Walter de Gruyter, Jan 1, 1999 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 602 pages
0 Reviews

The series builds an extensive collection of high quality descriptions of languages around the world. Each volume offers a comprehensive grammatical description of a single language together with fully analyzed sample texts and, if appropriate, a word list and other relevant information which is available on the language in question. There are no restrictions as to language family or area, and although special attention is paid to hitherto undescribed languages, new and valuable treatments of better known languages are also included. No theoretical model is imposed on the authors; the only criterion is a high standard of scientific quality.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

124 Appositional phrases
312
125 Names
315
a and o
316
127 Structure of the prepostional phrase
320
128 Semantic range of the different prepostions
322
129 Functions of the oblique phrase
323
oblique article idi
325
1211 Individual prepositions
327

25 Processes involving nasals
38
26 Orthographic issues
43
3 Syntactic units and the clause
47
33 Guide to Tukang Besi grammatical forms
50
34 Verbal clauses
51
35 Nonverbal clauses
56
36 Other clause types
58
37 Pragmatically determined variations in clause structure
59
38 Articles and case marking
63
39 A short note on interclausal relations
67
310 The status and structure of phrases in the clause
68
core and oblique arguments
74
312 Summary
80
4 Word classes
83
42 Word classes and the problem of overlap
86
43 Open word classes
90
45 Verbs and adjectives
91
46 Closed word classes
105
47 A note on derivational and inflectional categories
112
5 Pronouns
113
52 Use of the free forms
115
53 Affixed pronominal forms
123
54 Subject prefixes
129
55 Possessive suffixes
131
56 Scope of possessive antecedency
133
57 Object agreement
134
58 Dative object agreement
135
6 Demonstratives
137
set two
138
64 Use of the different demonstrative forms
142
65 Use of the demonstratives
144
66 The use of the demonstratives in discourse tracking
149
7 Verb phrases
151
72 Subject prefixes
152
73 Subject infix um
154
74 Possessive marking on adjectives
156
75 Irregularities in subject marking
157
76 Object suffixes
158
77 External possession
166
78 Object incorporation
167
79 Aspect and auxiliaries
170
710 Adverbs
177
8 Serial verb constructions
181
82 Noncontiguous serialisation
184
83 Contiguous serialisaton
193
84 Summary of morphosyntactic differences
202
85 Serial verbs and other grammatical categories
203
9 Causative morphology
205
92 Factitive hoko
208
93 Causative pa
211
94 Requestive hepe
217
combinations
219
96 Causatives and ditransitive verbs
220
summary
221
10 Applicative morphology
225
102 Comitative applicative suffix ngkene
228
103 General applicative suffix ako
231
104 Locative applicative suffix complex VCi
242
105 Double applicatives
247
106 Applicatives and ditransitive verbs
258
summary
260
108 Combining properties and the question of symmetry or asymmetry
266
11 Other verbal morphology
271
112 Passive prefixes
274
113 Valencyneutral prefixes
281
114 Valencyannouncing prefixes
284
115 Causativeapplicative combinations
290
116 Combinations with reciprocals
293
117 Combinations with passives
297
118 Reduplication
298
119 The position of verbal morphology
301
core and oblique phrases
303
122 KPs with an NP headed in the N position
305
123 NPs not headed in the N position
309
1212 Complex prepositions
332
ako pake and kene
333
13 Possession and possessive constructions
337
133 Clausal possession
348
134 Summary
352
14 Nonverbal and semiverbal clauses
353
143 Oblique Predicate clauses
355
144 Presentative clauses
357
145 Numerical clauses
359
146 Comparative clauses
360
147 Exclamatory clauses
362
149 Negative existential clauses
364
15 Relative clauses
367
152 Aspect and polarity in relative clauses
368
153 Multiple relative clauses
370
154 Subject relative clauses
372
155 Instrumental relative clauses
376
156 Object relative clauses
379
157 Internal relative clauses
385
relative phrases
387
16 Complementation
389
162 Types of complementtaking predicates
390
163 Complementisers
393
164 Verbs of desire
394
165 Verbs of mental perception
399
166 Verbs of decision
401
167 Physical perception complements
402
168 Verbs of manipulation
404
169 Discourse complements
406
17 Adverbials
409
173 Adverbial clauses of time
411
174 Conditional ara karo
415
175 Concessional bisa
416
18 Conjoining
421
182 Clauses joined without a conjunction
425
183 Clauses joined with a conjunction
426
184 Conjoining Vs
431
185 Conjoining NPs
432
186 Floating conjuncts
439
187 Reciprocal constructions
444
19 Speech acts
447
192 Negation
448
193 Interrogatives questions and answers
449
194 Imperative verbforms and commands
452
195 Imprecatives and insulting
455
196 Suggestions and hortatives
456
197 Summonses and vocatives
457
199 Exclamatory sentences and surprise
458
1910 Sentencefinal particles
459
20 Pivots and grammatical relations
461
202 Pivots in Tukang Besi
462
203 SA and O pivots
463
204 Nominative pivots
469
205 Nominative pivots with SO constraint
472
206 Nominative pivot with ThemePatient constraint
473
207 Nonnominative pivot
474
209 Agent pivots
475
2010 Instrumental pivots
476
existential clauses
478
2012 Pivotless constructions
479
2013 Grammatical categories
480
2014 Summary
489
Texts
491
2 Pada
503
3 Wa Sabusaburengki
505
4 Tukang Besi
511
5 La Kohokoho kene La Kandokendoke The Heron and the Monkey
516
6 La Kolokolopua ke La Kandokendoke The Tortoise and the Monkey
521
7 Te Daoa The Market
530
Wordlist
533
Notes
555
References
557
Index
573
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information