A Great and Glorious Game: Baseball Writings of A. Bartlett Giamatti

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Algonquin Books, Jan 1, 1998 - Sports & Recreation - 121 pages
With a foreword by David Halberstam. He spoke out against player trading. He banned Pete Rose from baseball for gambling. He even asked sports fans to clean up their acts. Bart Giamatti was baseball's Renaissance man and its commissioner. In A GREAT AND GLORIOUS GAME, a collection of spirited, incisive essays, Giamatti reflects on the meaning of the game. Baseball, for him, was a metaphor for life. He artfully argues that baseball is much more than an American "pastime." "Baseball is about going home," he wrote, "and how hard it is to get there and how driven is our need." And in his powerful 1989 decision to ban Pete Rose from baseball, Giamatti states that no individual is superior to the game itself, just as no individual is superior to our democracy. A GREAT AND GLORIOUS GAME is a thoughtful meditation on baseball, character, and values by one of the most eloquent men in the world of sport.
 

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A GREAT AND GLORIOUS GAME: Baseball Writings of A. Bartlett Giamatti

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Giamatti died just nine years ago, after having served as commissioner of baseball for only five months. Already, however, a Greek word that appears several times in this slim collection applies to ... Read full review

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Giamatti thought more deeply than anyone about the meaning of baseball to the American people.

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Contents

THE GREEN FIELDS OF THE MIND
7
TOM SEAVERS FAREWELL
15
RECALL AS THE SERIES ENDS THE AFTERNOON OF THE FALL
29
MEN OF BASEBALL LEND AN EAR
35
BASEBALL AND THE AMERICAN CHARACTER
41
DECISION IN THE APPEAL OF KEVIN GROSS
67
CLEAN UP YOUR ACT
81
BASEBALL AS NARRATIVE
87
STATEMENT RELEASED TO THE PRESS ON THE PETE ROSE MATTER
117
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About the author (1998)

Kenneth S. Robson, M.D., is a professor of psychiatry at the University of Connecticut, a clinical professor at Yale University, his alma mater, and a practicing child and adolescent psychiatrist.

David Halberstam was born on April 10, 1934 in New York City and later attended Harvard University. After graduating in 1955, Halberstam worked at a small daily newspaper until he attained a position at the Nashville Tennessean. Halberstam has written over 20 books including The Children, a written account of his coverage of the Civil Rights Movement; The Best and Brightest, which was a bestseller; and The Game and October, 1964, both detailing his fascination of sports. Halberstam also won a Pulitzer Prize for his reports on the Vietnam War while working for the New York Times. He was killed in a car crash on April 23, 2007 at the age of 73.

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