A Greek and English lexicon: adapted to the authors read in the colleges and schools of the United States, and to other Greek classics

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Hilliard, Gray, Little, and Wilkins, 1829 - English language - 911 pages
 

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Page iii - ... improvements in France, where a valuable edition of it was published in 1779, by the celebrated scholar Vauvilliers ; who, as the late editor Lecluse observes, " mercilessly " retrenched all the expositions of the anomalous words and other parts of the work. These retrenchments have been restored by Lecluse, whose edition of 1819 is the latest French one that happens to have come to our knowledge. Of the other editions, we have before us the Italian one in folio, and a German one, reprinted from...
Page iv - ... articles in it are either wholly new, or have new additions, of more or less importance ; these articles are distinguished by a bracket placed at the end of them. Besides the additions thus marked, very numerous references to authors have been inserted without being thus designated. The prepositions have been a particular subject of attention ; and the uses of the article are explained with as much minuteness as would be advantageous to that class of students for which the work is chiefly designed....
Page iii - Latin terms do ; but principally from a desire to obviate the embarrassment arising from the ambiguity of the general terms used in the Latin, by substituting for them English significations less general, and of course more precise. It has been the intention of the Editors, that the work should comprehend all the words which are to be found in Professor Dalzel's Collectanea Majora and Minora, Jacobs's Greek Reader, and the other books now studied in our schools and other seminaries of learning ;...
Page v - Jones was not received, until so much progress had been made in the present work, as to prevent much use of it ; and, just before the last sheets were printed off, a copy of the London translation of Schrevelius reached this country ; which, till the Editors had looked into it, made them regret that they had not sooner met with it. A slight examination, however, made it apparent, that although it contained many additional words, yet it was a hurried performance, upon which it would not have been...
Page ii - I RETURN you your friend's letter, which gave me great satisfaction. The sentence upon lord Thanet and Ferguson is, all things considered, most abominable ; but the speech accompanying it is, if possible, worse. I think a Lexicon in Greek and English is a work much wanted; and, if you can have patience to execute such a work, I shall consider it a great benefit to the cause of literature. I hope to hear from you, that your situation at Dorchester is not worse, at least, than you expected ; and, when...
Page 440 - TRAGEDY, as it was anciently composed, hath been ever held the gravest, moralest, and most profitable of all other poems ; therefore said by Aristotle to be of power, by raising pity and fear, or terror, to purge the mind of those and such like passions, that is, to temper and reduce them to just measure with a kind of delight, stirred up by reading or seeing those passions well imitated.
Page iii - Schrevelius's Latin interpretations, which are often ambiguous and unsatisfactory ; but they have, to the best of their ability, rendered the English explanations from the original Greek. It will be at once perceived, that the significations given are more copious than the Latin ones of Schrevelius. This has been occasioned partly by the difficulty of always finding single English words, which would correspond to the Greek so exactly as many of the Latin terms do ; but principally from a desire to...
Page iii - ... the author also made use of Portus's Ionic and Doric Lexicons, and the Lexicon to Pindar and the other Lyric poets. It was published several times on the continent of Europe during the author's life ; and within that period was also republished in England by Hill, who enlarged it considerably, more particularly with words from the New Testament, the Septuagint, and the principal poets and orators, as well the school books of the day.

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