A Guide to Market Fruits of Southeast Asia

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askmar publishing, Jul 15, 2010 - Cooking
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This electronic book is a reprint of a book by the same name, published in 1985 by the South China Morning Post in Hong Kong. It differs from the original in that page numbers have been replaced by bi-directional hypertext links, and the illustrations have been moved to the beginning of each section.

I have not been back to these markets since then, but I believe the same amazing variety of fruits still thrive there, still reach local markets and — increasingly, are reaching markets outside Asia. Written in the same format and with the same intention as its precursor, “Cook’s Guide to Chinese Vegetables”, this book is meant to inform and inspire. I’d like to give you readers the knowledge and confidence to try something new.

The more-than-80 fruits described here are among those found in Southeast Asian markets; they include both local varieties and imported, international favorites. The text includes a description of each fruit, hints on how to tell good (ripe) ones from the bad, the means of preparation (to peel or not to peel?), and then suggestions for use. Some are simply eaten raw, while many can be used in a variety of dishes, deserts and preserves, both sweet and savory. Occasionally, there is a specific recipe; more commonly, readers are referred to the general recipe section that follows this introduction. Here you will find recipes for a range of fruit products from sweet trifles to sweet-sour chutneys to more savory Asian salads.

Fruit lovers both in and out of Asia will find the information here useful, if not fascinating. Those living or traveling in Asia can actually try them. Those living elsewhere will have to wait, but as more and more of these exotic fruits are coming into Asian groceries, and as more and more Asian groceries pop up all over the world, that chance may be coming soon. For both readers, I wish you delicious adventures. Bon appétit!

New to the 2010 Edition
This electronic book is a reprint of a book by the same name, published in 1985 by the South China Morning Post in Hong Kong. It differs from the original in that page numbers have been replaced by bi-directional hypertext links, and the illustrations have been moved to the beginning of each section. 
 

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Contents

Tarap exterior
Chempedak
Jakfruit exterior
Fig
Mulberry
Arbutus Chinese
Nutmeg fruit
Myrtle Family

Banana
Jamaican banana
Dwarf cavendish
Horn plantain
Salak
Betel nut
Coconut
Coconut opened
Mango Family
Indian mango
Haden mango
Local Southeast Asian Mangoes
Otaheite apple
Plum mango
Kiwi fruit
Bullocks heart
Sugar apple
Soursop
Durian inside
Papaya
Melon
Watermelon
Velvet apple
Persimmon
Malay gooseberry
Emblic
Rambai
Rambai interior
Mangosteen
Avocado
Roselle
Santol
Langsat
Duku
Breadfruit exterior
Breadnut
Guava
Strawberry guava
Water apple
Malay apple
Carambola or star fruit
Camias
Passionfruit
Granadilla
Pomegranate
Indian jujube
Rose Family
Strawberry
Apple
Plum
Pears
Loquat
Citrus Family
Sweet orange
Tangerine
Mandarin
Pomelo
Kalamansi or musk lime
Makrut lime
Wampi
Citron
Kumquat
Calamondin
Dragons eye fruit
Litchi
Pulasan
Rambutan
Sapodilla brown
Star apple
Index
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)

 Martha Dahlen is a writer, gardener, and cook. She was born in Ohio; raised in Virginia; and received her BS degree at Purdue University (Indiana) in Horticulture.


She arrived in Hong Kong in 1977 where she lived for the following 21 years. Initially she worked in the Department of Botany at the University of Hong Kong as a teaching assistant, during which time she completed a Ph.D. in Botany on the taxonomy of the Fern Allies. For the next ten years, Dr. Dahlen worked at the Hong Kong University of Science & Technology, primarily as an editor. During her years in Hong Kong, she traveled extensively in Southeast Asia. Her most widely known book is “Popular Guide to Chinese Vegetables,” which is also illustrated by her long-time friend Karen Phillipps.

She currently lives in Campbell, CA with a Cantonese kungfu master where she bikes, hikes, knits, meditates, cogitates, and blogs.

For more information, visit:

http://www.mdahlen.com

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