A Guide to Teaching Practice

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Psychology Press, 1996 - Education - 494 pages
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A Guide to Teaching Practice is the major standard text for all students on initial teacher training courses in the UK. Authoritative yet accessible, it covers the important basic skills and issues that students need to consider during their practice, such as planning, classroom organization, behaviour management and assessment. The book's focus on the quality of teaching and learning and consideration of the latest regulations and guidelines ensures that it fits comfortably within TTA and OFSTED frameworks. In addition, comprehensively revised and fully updated, this fifth edition features brand new chapters on the foundation stage, legal issues, learning and teaching and using ICT in the classroom, as well as new material on numeracy, literacy, children's rights, progress files and gifted and talented children. This book is the most respected and widely used textbook for initial teacher training courses and will be an essential resource for any student teacher. -- Publisher description.
 

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Contents

Some perspectives on teaching and learning
1
The politicisation of education
3
Information technology and changes in teaching and learning
14
Action planning in teaching and learning
17
The impact of schoolbased initial teacher education
20
An overview of the national curriculum of England and Wales
32
Preparation and planning
39
The preliminary visit
43
RESPONDING
241
SUMMARISING
242
LANGUAGE AND CLASSROOM INTERACTION
243
Equal opportunities
248
GENDER
252
ETHNICITY
256
SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS
269
Management and control in the classroom
281

UNDERSTANDING RULES AND ROUTINES
49
PARTICULAR INFORMATION TO RECORD
53
Aims and objectives
57
SOME CHARACTERISTICS OF AIMS
59
1 BEHAVIOURAL AND 2 NONBEHAVIOURAL
60
SOME CHARACTERISTICS OF BEHAVIOURAL OBJECTIVES
63
THE STUDENT TEACHER AND BEHAVIOURAL OBJECTIVES
66
NONBEHAVIOURAL OBJECTIVES
69
THE DEBATE SURROUNDING THE USE OF BEHAVIOURAL OBJECTIVES
70
IDENTIFYING AND WRITING OBJECTIVES
72
OBJECTIVES IN INDIVIDUALISED LEARNING
75
CONCLUSION SOME SUGGESTIONS
76
Beginning curriculum planning
77
THE ELEMENTS OF PLANNING
81
CHARACTERISTICS OF THE CURRICULUM
82
STAGING CURRICULUM PLANNING
90
WHAT TO INCLUDE IN A SCHEME OF WORK
94
SUBJECTBASED AND TOPICBASED APPROACHES TO THE PRIMARY CURRICULUM
95
AN APPROACH TO PLANNING A SCHEME OF WORK
97
EVALUATION SELFEVALUATION AND REVIEW
120
EVALUATION OF ACHIEVEMENT OF OVERALL AIMS FOR THE TEACHING PRACTICE
124
EVALUATION OF ACHIEVEMENT OF THE SCHEMES OF WORK
125
WEEKLY AND DAILY EVALUATIONS
126
EVALUATION OF SPECIFIC LESSONS
127
Practising teaching
137
Primary teaching
139
CLASSROOM ORGANISATION
150
SOME ORGANISATIONAL CONCEPTS IN PRIMARY EDUCATION
164
TEACHING AND LEARNING STYLES IN PRIMARY CLASSROOMS
175
Secondary teaching
186
FIRST MEETINGS WITH ONES CLASSES
189
LESSON PRESENTATION SKILLS
193
TEACHING STYLES
196
SOME RELEVANT RESEARCH FINDINGS
198
Mixedability teaching
202
TEACHING STRATEGIES IN MIXEDABILITY GROUPS
206
DIFFERENT ABILITIES WITHIN MIXEDABILITY CLASSES
211
STUDENTS WITH LEARNING DIFFICULTIES
212
BRIGHT PUPILS
213
RESOURCES
214
WORKCARDS AND WORKSHEETS
215
IMPLICATIONS FOR STUDENT TEACHERS
217
Language in classrooms
220
EXPOSITION
224
EXPLANATION
225
QUESTIONS AND QUESTIONING
229
DISCUSSION
240
SCHOOLS OF THOUGHT ON CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT
291
STUDENTS EXPECTATIONS OF TEACHERS
297
SOME FACTORS AFFECTING BEHAVIOUR IN CLASSROOMS
301
WHAT MAKES PUPILS MISBEHAVE?
303
RULES AND ROUTINES IN THE CLASSROOM
308
SUGGESTIONS FOR HANDLING MINOR MISBEHAVIOUR PROBLEMS
312
DEALING WITH REPEATED MINOR MISBEHAVIOUR
314
DEALING WITH PERSISTENT DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOUR
315
THE RIPPLE EFFECT
319
ISSUING ORDERS AND INSTRUCTIONS
321
REWARDS AND PUNISHMENTS
323
BEHAVIOUR MODIFICATION AND ASSERTIVE DISCIPLINE
332
ANTICIPATING MANAGEMENT AND CONTROL PROBLEMS IN THE CLASSROOM
336
BEHAVIOURAL PROBLEMS WITH SOME ETHNICMINORITY STUDENTS
337
CLASS MANAGEMENT ON TEACHING PRACTICE
339
The classroom environment and situational factors
342
THE EMOTIONAL ENVIRONMENT
347
TEACHERSTUDENT RELATIONSHIPS
350
MODELLING
353
STUDENT TEACHERS ATTITUDES AND EXPECTATIONS AND THE INFLUENCE THEY EXERT ON CLASSROOM BEHAVIOUR
357
Assessment recordkeeping and records of achievement
361
Assessment
363
UK CONTEXT OF ASSESSMENT
366
THE PURPOSES OF ASSESSMENT
369
TYPES OF ASSESSMENT
371
RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY IN ASSESSMENTS
376
METHODS OF GATHERING ASSESSMENT DATA
382
PROVIDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR ASSESSMENT
397
DESIGNING AN ASSESSMENT TASK
398
A WORKED EXAMPLE OF AN ASSESSMENT ACTIVITY
403
Recordkeeping
407
THE PURPOSES OF RECORDKEEPING
408
USE OF THE RECORD FOR REPORTING PURPOSES
409
CONTENTS OF THE RECORD
410
THE AUDIENCES OF THE RECORD
411
TIMING OF THE RECORD ENTRY
421
Records of achievement
424
THE PURPOSES OF A RECORD OF ACHIEVEMENT
425
CONTENTS OF A RECORD OF ACHIEVEMENT
427
FINDING TIME TO COMPLETE A RECORD OF ACHIEVEMENT
429
WRITING COMMENTS ON A RECORD OF ACHIEVEMENT
430
EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES AND RECORDS OF ACHIEVEMENT
432
Postscript
435
Notes
436
Bibliography
470
Index
490
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About the author (1996)

Keith Morrison was Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Durham and is currently Professor of Education and Vice-Rector at the Inter-University of Macau. Lawrence Manion was formerly Principal Lecturer in Music at Manchester Metropolitan University. Louis Cohen is emeritus professor of education at Loughborough University of Technology.

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