A Guide to the Jerusalem Talmud

Front Cover
Universal-Publishers, 2002 - Religion - 252 pages
0 Reviews
This book is a compilation and composition of the Jerusalem Talmud, the cultural, economic and political conditions in the Land of Israel during its development, the scholars who studied it throughout the generations, and a synopsis of their research and commentaries.Examined in detail is the transformation of the Roman empire from paganism to Christianity and the effect this has had on the Jerusalem Talmud. Also explored is the sordid and almost successful attempt at the end of the 1800's to present a forged work as the newly "discovered" missing Order of the Jerusalem Talmud.Jewish Law is based on the Talmud which was codified approximately 1500 years ago. There are actually two Talmuds, one which was codified in Babylonia (The Babylonian Talmud) and the other which was codified in the Land of Israel (The Jerusalem Talmud.) The differences between these two Talmuds and why one was eclipsed by the other are amongthe issues addressed in this work.Although the Jerusalem Talmud was superceded by the younger Babylonian Talmud it is, nevertheless, a massive work that contains not only a collection of Jewish Law and lore, but also important historical, political and cultural information regarding the Land of Israel and the Roman empire ca. 220 - 375 C.E.Although, there are literally thousands of works that have been published on the Babylonian Talmud, there are very few on the Jerusalem Talmud. This textbook is a unique "how-to" guide that also summarizes the research and scholarly work performed on the Jerusalem Talmud throughout the generations. It is useful to both scholar and layman to understand how the Jerusalem Talmud was formulated and how it subsequently helped shape the lives and beliefs of the Jewish people.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Jerusalem Talmud
21
Compilation of the Jerusalem Talmud
29
Time line
34
Arrangement of the Jerusalem Talmud
44
Comparison of Talmud Bavli and Yerushalmi
47
Editing Quality
49
Citing Baraitot
50
Angels
51
Under the Roman Empire
92
Christian Rome
94
Julian the Apostate
95
The Abortive Attempt to Rebuild the Jewish Temple
97
The Language of the Jerusalem Talmud
104
Yerushalmi Manuscripts
109
Vatican 133
111
Manuscript with commentary of Solomon Sirillo
112

The Stammoth
55
Amoraim in the Land of Israel
56
First Generation 220250
58
Second Generation 250290
60
Third Generation 290320
63
Fourth Generation 320350
65
Fifth Generation 350375
66
The Patriarchate and the Sanhedrin
70
The Sanhedrin at Yavneh
72
The Sanhedrin at Usha
73
The Sanhedrin at Sepphoris
74
The Sanhedrin at Tiberias
75
Social and Economic Conditions in the Land of Israel
79
The Battle for Supremacy of the Two Talmuds
85
Printing the Jerusalem Talmud
117
The Commentators
145
Parallel Sugyot
159
Foreign Aggadic Text
160
Manuscript Fragments
163
Orders Kodashim and Teharot
166
The Fraudulent Yerushalmi on Order Kodashim
174
The Missing Text of the Yerushalmi
197
Appendices
205
Talmudic Terminology
206
Cross Reference Vilna Edition to Editio Princeps
214
Bibliography
236
Index
245
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 39 - Since Gamaliel supposed that he could transgress the law with impunity all the more because he was elevated to the pinnacle of dignities. Your Illustrious Authority shall know that Our Serenity has directed orders to the Illustrious Master of the Offices, that the appointment documents to the honorary prefecture shall be taken from him, so that he shall remain in the honour that was his before he was granted the prefecture...
Page 40 - What they call the Mishnah, ... we prohibit entirely, for it is not included among the Holy Books, nor was it handed down from above by the prophets, but it is an invention of men in their chatter, exclusively of earthly origin and having in it nothing of the divine.

Bibliographic information