A Guide to the Study of Book-plates: (ex-libris)

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Page 98 - If thou art borrowed by a friend, Right welcome shall he be To read, to study, not to lend, But to return to me. Not that imparted knowledge doth Diminish learning's store; But books, I find, if often lent, Return to me no more.
Page 26 - CHIPPENDALE, THOMAS. — The Gentleman and Cabinet-Maker's Director. Being a large collection of the most Elegant and Useful Designs of Household Furniture in the Gothic, Chinese and Modern Taste...
Page 39 - The design represents a vast structure, rather like an ormolu chimney-piece clock, of which the arms of the University of Cambridge, in a plain, solid frame, represent the face. Behind this towers up a vast pyramid, on which the brick work is distinctly marked. As dexter supporter stands Phcebus Apollo in person, reaching out a wreath. A clouded sun rays out behind him. At his feet are deposited samples of the book collection of late so munificently bestowed. As sinister supporter sits Minerva with...
Page 98 - Neither blemish this book, or the leaves double down, Nor lend it to each idle friend in the town; Return it when read ; or, if lost, please supply Another as good to the mind and the eye.
Page 91 - His Excellency the Right Honourable Thomas Earl of Strafford, Viscount Wentworth of Wentworth Woodhouse, and of Stainborough, Baron of Raby, Newmarch, and Oversley, Her Majesty's Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to the States General of ye United Provinces, and also at the Congress of Utrecht ; Colonel of Her Majesty's own Royal Regiment of Dragoons...
Page 91 - Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, and Knight of the Most Noble Order of the Garter.
Page 123 - And here i cannot, but with much reverence, mention the every-way Right Honourable Thomas Howard, Lord High Marshal of England, as great for his noble patronage of arts and ancient learning as for his birth and place ; to whose liberal charges and magnificence this angle of the world oweth the first sight of Greek and Roman statues, with whose admired presence he began to honour the gardens and galleries of Arundel-house about twenty years agoi2, and hath ever since continued to transplant old Greece...
Page 74 - Crest, a leopard pass. sa. bezantee, ducally gorged and chained or, holding in the dexter paw a trefoil, slipped, vert. Supporters, two leopards sa.
Page 97 - Now this batch of mottoes raises the point, whether valuable books should be lent to persons who treat volumes like coal scuttles; who perpetrate such atrocities as moistening their thumbs to turn a page over ; who hold a fine binding before a roaring fire ; who, horribile dictu, read at breakfast, and use, as a book-marker, the butter-knife. Ought...
Page 101 - Navy about the old business of tickets, where the only expedient they have found is to bind the Commanders and Officers by oaths. The Duke of York told me how the Duke of Buckingham, after the Council the other day, did make mirth at...

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