A Handbook and Grammar of the Tagalog Language

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1905 - Tagalog language - 264 pages
 

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Page 80 - A person remarked that when he counted over his basket of nuts two by two, three by three, four by four, five by five, or six by six, there was one remaining ; but when he counted them by sevens there was no remainder. How many had he?
Page 107 - ... insisted on to the obscuration of the higher branches of philology and ethnology rather than to their illustration (as I venture to think), and but for which obscuration our Leydens and our Joneses, our Bopps and our Humboldts, could never have been found at such extreme apparent diversity of opinion. I may add, with reference to the disputed primitiveness of Ta-gala, owing to its use of the "artifices...
Page 107 - Few languages present a greater appearance of originality than the Ta-gala. Though a multitude of its terms agree precisely with those of the languages just enumerated (the Western Polynesian), yet the simple terms are so metamorphosed by a variety of the most simple contrivances, that it becomes impossible (difficult...
Page 233 - Abraham begat Isaac; and Isaac begat Jacob; and Jacob begat Judas and his brethren; 3 And Judas begat Phares and Zara of Thamar; and Phares begat Esrom; and Esrom begat Aram...
Page 14 - the Arabic words in Tagalog, which are hardly more than a dozen in number, evidently came in with the Mohammedan religion, and upon the extinction of that faith around the mouth of the Pasig at Manila, all but a few words fell into disuse. Mohammedanism could hardly have become established in the Tagalog region before 1450 to 1500, as it came very slowly from India or Arabia to Java, and thence by way of Borneo and Sulu to the Bay of Manila and the Pasig valley. Some Arabic words...
Page 107 - S.II.H.) to the simple vocables (roots) of certain particles (serviles) which are again combined with others; and the complete or partial repetition of terms in this re-duplication may be again combined with other particles.
Page 13 - ... Sumatra, the Malay Peninsula, and the Philippines from east to west, a distance of 180°, or half the circumference of the earth. Tagalog, together with the other civilized tongues of the Philippines, such as Visayan, Pampango, Ilocano and Bicol, has preserved the verbal system better than any other. The basis for the comparative study of the family must be taken from the Philippine tongues and not from the more cultivated Malay, Kawi, or modern Javanese, all three of which have been profoundly...
Page 107 - Kiranti,* for instance, has thirty-three personal forms for each tense ; and, as many tense-forms as there are thus constituted, so many are there of the gerunds and of the participles — a Manchuric trait of great interest. The more advanced tribes, whether of the continent or of the islands, have, generally speaking, long since cast away all or most of these
Page 46 - Enero Febrero Marzo Abril Mayo Junto Julio Agosto Septiembre Octubre Noviembre Diciembre...
Page 13 - Philologically, Tagalog belongs to the Malayan branch of the great Malayo-Polynesian linguistic family, which extends from Hawaii to Madagascar and from Formosa to Easter Island west of Chile, including New Zealand, Tonga, and Samoa, as well as Borneo, Celebes, Java, Sumatra, the Malay Peninsula, and the Philippines, from east to west, a distance of 180°, or half the circumference of the earth.

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