A Handbook for History Teachers

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University Press of America, Sep 28, 2012 - Education - 312 pages
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History is not a mere chronicle of facts, but a dialogue between competing interpretations of the past; it should be taught as such. Teaching history in this way makes it both intellectually demanding and more interesting, while at the same time helps students acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to become functioning citizens in a democracy. The opening chapters provide the rationale for the study of history, its epistemological basis, and the logic of the discipline. The bulk of the book deals with practical ways to help students acquire, process, and apply information. In particular, it addresses the specific thinking skills required by the discipline, with many effective techniques for helping students to master them. The implications of this approach for teacher evaluation of student work are also addressed.
 

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Contents

Chapter 1 The Teaching of History Rationale
1
Chapter 2 The Nature of the Discipline
14
Chapter 3 The Logic of History
24
Chapter 4 Teaching the Nature of the Discipline
42
Chapter 5 Helping Students Acquire Data Lecture and Audiovisual
58
Chapter 6 Helping Students Acquire Data Reading
76
Chapter 7 Reading Graphics
95
Chapter 8 Processing Data
109
Chapter 12 Recall and TestTaking
179
Chapter 13 Oral Questioning
201
Chapter 14 The Nature of DocumentBased Questions
213
Chapter 15 Answering DocumentBased Questions
232
Chapter 16 Evaluation
255
Chapter 17 Classroom Management
267
Appendix 1 Simplified Rules of Parliamentary Procedure
287
Appendix 2 Index of TeachingLearning Activities
290

Chapter 9 Translation into other Forms
127
Chapter 10 Research
144
Chapter 11 Writing
161

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About the author (2012)

James A. Duthie was born in Edinburgh, Scotland and earned an M.A. in history from the University of Edinburgh. After working for several years, he trained as a teacher at the University of Victoria and began teaching in 1978. Now retired, his interests include the study of history, writing, choral singing, gardening, and keeping fit.

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