A Handbook for the Study of Human Communication: Methods and Instruments for Observing, Measuring, and Assessing Communication Processes

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Charles H. Tardy
Greenwood Publishing Group, 1988 - Business & Economics - 407 pages
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This book describes the available options, and the rationale for selecting among them, for observing, measureing or assessing process of communication. This approach contrasts radically to the one taken in many preceding volumes which explain the applicability of general types of quantitative research, for example, content analysis, laboratory experiments, and statistical analysis, to the study of communication. This approach focuses on the methodological problems and solutions unique to the study of communication. It provides the readers with an outline of the problems and/or alternatives that face the researcher.

 

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Contents

Cognitive Complexity Using The Role Category Questionnaire Measure
1
Cognitive Processes Methods for Probing the Black Box
37
Communication Competence Measures of Perceived Effectiveness
67
Communication Networks Measurement Techniques
107
Communication Style Considerations for Measuring Consistency Reciprocity and Compensation
139
Conversation Data Acquisition and Analysis
163
Dyadic Personal Relationships Measurement Options
193
Group Communication Research Considerations for the Use of Interaction Analysis
229
Interpersonal Evaluations Measuring Attraction and Trust
269
Interpersonal Interaction Coding Systems
285
Language Variables Conceptual and Methodological Problems of Instantiation
301
SelfDisclosure Objectives and Methods of Measurement
323
Social Support Conceptual Clarification and Measurement Options
347
SociallyBased Anxiety A Review of Measures
365
Author Index
385
Subject Index
402

Group Decision Making An Approach to Integrative Research
247

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Page 3 - Developmental psychology postulates one regulative principle of development; it is an orthogenetic principle which states that wherever development occurs it proceeds from a state of relative globality and lack of differentiation to a state of increasing differentiation, articulation, and hierarchic integration.* This principle has the status of an heuristic definition.

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