A Heart, a Cross & a Flag: America Today

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Simon and Schuster, 2003 - Political Science - 270 pages
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"This is a book about love." So begins Peggy Noonan's enormously moving collection of her post-September 11 Wall Street Journal commentaries. On the morning of the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, Noonan began writing, and produced at least one essay every week through September 11, 2002. These candid, compassionate and sometimes heart-wrenching pieces are full of insights and observations picked up throughout the country -- on experiencing the return of religious faith to a great modern city; on how the events influenced our perceptions of what it means to live in New York, or to be a man, or to take part in a community. Taking her own, her city's and her country's pulse, she administered a welcome dose of humanity, affirmation and inspiration, quickly attracting a large and loyal readership. This first draft of history -- a record, written on the ground, of what it felt like to be an American that day, and the days after -- balances the immediacy of the tragedy with its broader meaning for our world. Noonan, the bestselling author of When Character Was King, brings to these articles her unsurpassed powers of description: walking on the streets and riding on the buses of Manhattan in the hours and days following the attack; watching, along with most of the country, the televised reportage, public announcements, expert opinions and tributes; witnessing our "post-incident heartache" and anxiety, as well as the "spirited gaiety of New Yorkers at this time in history." By training our gaze on everyone from firemen, Catholic and Muslim mourners and the President to news anchors, bus drivers and school kids, these essays not only depict America in all its beautiful and diverse strengths but serve as an emblem of such. At once elegant and tough, elegiac and proud, outraged and tender, full of street smarts and down-home wisdom, this book will help Americans understand their emotional and intellectual responses to those devastating events. For everyone who felt scared, saddened, outraged and humbled but not defeated by the horror of that day, here is a balm and an apt tribute to what we lost and what we learned about ourselves.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bnbookgirl - LibraryThing

Read this in honor of the Sept 11 anniversary. Glad I did. Peggy Noonan is such a brilliant essayist. My favorite by far was From September 11 to Eternity. This book chronicles her writings that she ... Read full review

A HEART, A CROSS, AND A FLAG: America Today

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Wall Street Journal columnist and eloquent Republican apologist Noonan (Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness, 1994, etc.) reprints pieces that ran weekly in the year following 9/11.There is ... Read full review

Contents

There Is No Time There Will Be Time
7
God Is Back
16
FRIDAY OCTOBER 5 2001
26
vill CONTENTS
46
FRIDAY NOVEMBER 9 2001
61
FRIDAY NOVEMBER 23 2001
70
FRIDAY DECEMBER 7 2001
84
FRIDAY DECEMBER 14 2001
94
FRIDAY MARCH 15 2002
154
FRIDAY MARCH 22 2002
161
Bush Makes the Right Move
168
FRIDAY APRIL 12 2002
175
Will Clinton Talk?
184
The Crying Room
188
FRIDAY MAY 24 2002
201
FRIDAY JUNE 21 2002
224

FRIDAY JANUARY 4 2002
106
Plainspoken Eloquence
117
Why We Talk About Reagan
121
FRIDAY FEBRUARY 15 2002
130
FRIDAY MARCH 1 2002
140
FRIDAY JULY 19 2002
242
The Fighter vs the Lover
253
A Heart a Cross a Flag
261
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About the author (2003)

Peggy Noonan is a contributing editor of The Wall Street Journal and a columnist for the Journal's online editorial page. Her articles and essays have also appeared in Time, Newsweek, The Washington Post, Forbes and many other publications. Noonan is the author of five previous books, including the bestselling What I Saw at the Revolution and When Character Was King. She was a special assistant to President Ronald Reagan from 1984 to 1986. Noonan currently lives in her native New York City.

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