A Heart of Wisdom: Religion and Human Wholeness

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SUNY Press, 1992 - Religion - 254 pages
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Drawing on almost half a century of immersion in the world's great religions, coupled with an ever-deepening understanding of the philosophy and phenomenology of religion, the author takes a dialogical approach through which religious reality is not seen as external creed and form or as subjective inspiration, but as the meeting in openness, presentness, immediacy, and mutuality with ultimate reality. Religion has to do with the wholeness of human life. The absolute is found, not just in the universal, but in the particular and the unique. When it promotes a dualism in which the spirit has no binding claim upon life and life falls apart into unhallowed fragments, religion becomes the great enemy of humankind.
 

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Contents

Religion and the Religions
3
Part Two Religions with Which I Have Been in Dialogue
9
My Dialogue with the Religions
11
Exile Contending and Trust
31
Image of the Human or Image of God?
43
Hasidism
57
Part Three Religious Communication
77
The Meeting of Religion and Human Experience
79
Religion and Literature
119
Solitude and Community
131
Part Four The Tension between Past and Present
139
Tradition and Modernity
141
The Dialectic Between Spirit and Form
157
The Paradox of Religious Leadership
167
Spontaneity Decision and Personal Wholeness
189
World View and Existential Trust
207

The Via Humana
85
Religious Symbolism and Universal Religion
93
Legend Myth and Tale
107
Is Religion the Enemy of Humankind?
221
Index
241
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About the author (1992)

Maurice Friedman is Professor of Religious Studies, Philosophy, and Comparative Literature at San Diego State University and is Co-Director of the Institute for Dialogical Psychotherapy in San Diego. He is the author of over twenty books, including, Martin Buber: The Life of Dialogue; Martin Buber's Life and Work (3 volumes); Martin Buber and the Eternal; Abraham Joshua Heschel and Elie Wiesel: "You Are My Witnesses"; and Religion and Psychology: A Dialogical Approach.

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