A hill called White Horse: A Korean War story

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AuthorHouse, Feb 16, 2009 - History - 232 pages
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The battle of White Horse lasted ten days, with many lives lost. This story concentrates on the first two days of the battle, as recounted by Joe Adams, Jack Callaway, and the rest from the 213th Field Artillery Battalion who were there. These two days coincide with the letters and personal remembrances of these men and this story is based on their real life experiences. The events and people are real, coming from those personal interviews, declassified documents and historical reference. What they went through is real, documented history. This is a ‘story’ in that their actual minute-by-minute interactions and words have been interpreted, all with the spirit and intent of their every word. Not one of them has ever bragged about what they did or thought of themselves as some great warrior soldier. Everyone simply did what they had to do, and that there was no glory in it.

Not just another war story, this is an attempt to put the reader ‘there’ in the thick it, to be a participant in battle and to feel what it was like to be in the Forgotten War. Exploding artillery shells, bullets striking targets, the eeriness of flares drifting down over a battlefield, breathing the dust of trenches on a hill in the middle of a far off place. Taking the reader out of their seat and putting a rifle in their hands, this story transports you a thousand miles away from your surroundings to an artillery battery receiving ‘incoming mail’, trench lines where death is around every corner, and a bunker on a hill where some of the most violent combat takes place. This book lets you feel, taste and smell it like it was, brutal, unforgiving, and above all, a cold hard reality for those that were there.

 

 

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
8
Section 3
15
Section 4
20
Section 5
23
Section 6
28
Section 7
33
Section 8
35
Section 16
111
Section 17
116
Section 18
126
Section 19
130
Section 20
135
Section 21
139
Section 22
140
Section 23
143

Section 9
48
Section 10
49
Section 11
52
Section 12
70
Section 13
85
Section 14
97
Section 15
102
Section 24
149
Section 25
155
Section 26
162
Section 27
165
Section 28
173
Section 29
183
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

The battle of White Horse lasted ten days, with many lives lost. This story concentrates on the first two days of the battle, as recounted by Joe Adams, Jack Callaway, and the rest from the 213th Field Artillery Battalion who were there. These two days coincide with the letters and personal remembrances of these men and this story is based on their real life experiences. The events and people are real, coming from those personal interviews, declassified documents and historical reference. What they went through is real, documented history. This is a ?story? in that their actual minute-by-minute interactions and words have been interpreted, all with the spirit and intent of their every word. Not one of them has ever bragged about what they did or thought of themselves as some great warrior soldier. Everyone simply did what they had to do, and that there was no glory in it.

Not just another war story, this is an attempt to put the reader ?there? in the thick it, to be a participant in battle and to feel what it was like to be in the Forgotten War. Exploding artillery shells, bullets striking targets, the eeriness of flares drifting down over a battlefield, breathing the dust of trenches on a hill in the middle of a far off place. Taking the reader out of their seat and putting a rifle in their hands, this story transports you a thousand miles away from your surroundings to an artillery battery receiving ?incoming mail?, trench lines where death is around every corner, and a bunker on a hill where some of the most violent combat takes place. This book lets you feel, taste and smell it like it was, brutal, unforgiving, and above all, a cold hard reality for those that were there.

 

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