A History, Military and Municipal, of the Ancient Borough of the Devizes: And, Subordinately, of the Entire Hundred of Potterne and Cannings, in which it is Included

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Longman, 1859 - Devizes (England) - 602 pages
 

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Page 289 - ... him bade him be of good cheer, for that he would take the fault on himself. He kept his word accordingly. As soon as they were grown up to be men, the civil war broke out, in which our two friends took...
Page 289 - ... hearing the name of his old friend, and observing his face more attentively, which he had not seen for many years, asked him, if he was not formerly a Westminster scholar'? by the answer he was soon convinced that it was his former generous friend ; and, without saying...
Page 329 - Before I could return any answer to the letter with which your grace was pleased to favour me, I received intelligence that the Dutch were just coming to Wells ; upon which I immediately left the town, and in obedience to his majesty's general commands, took all my...
Page 289 - Master was too well known for the Criminal to expect any Pardon for such a Fault; so that the Boy, who was of a meek Temper, was terrified to Death at the Thoughts of his Appearance, when his Friend, who sat...
Page 388 - On Thursday the 25th of January, 1753, Ruth Pierce, of Potterne, in this county, agreed with three other women to buy a sack of wheat in the market, each paying her due proportion towards the same; one of these women, in collecting the several quotas of money, discovered a deficiency, and demanded of Ruth Pierce the sum which was wanting to make good the amount; Ruth Pierce protested that she had paid her share...
Page 105 - Christ's vicar, hath been lord of all the world as Christ is ; so that if he should have deprived the king of his crown, or you of the lordship of Bromeham, it had been enough : for he could do no wrong.
Page 448 - Gentlemen, here's my son, — will you have him recite from the poets, or take your, portraits...
Page 388 - ... women, in collecting the several quotas of money, discovered a deficiency, and demanded of Ruth Pierce the sum which was wanting to make good the amount; Ruth Pierce protested that she had paid her share; and said, She wished she might drop down dead, if she had not. She rashly repeated this awful wish, when, to the consternation and terror of the surrounding multitude, she instantly fell down, and expired, having the money concealed in her hand.

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