A History of African American Theatre

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Cambridge University Press, Jul 17, 2003 - Drama - 608 pages
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This is the first definitive history of African-American theatre. The text embraces a wide geography, investigating companies from coast to coast as well as the anglophone Caribbean and African American companies touring Europe, Australia and Africa. This history represents a catholicity of styles--from African ritual to European forms, from amateur to professional, and from political nationalism to integration. The volume covers all aspects of performance, including minstrel, vaudeville, and cabaret acts, as well as shows written by Whites that used black casts.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Slavery and conquest background to black theatre
11
The African Theatre to Uncle Toms Cabin
24
The Civil War to The Creole Show
61
American minstrelsy in black and white
93
New vistas plays spectacles musicals and opera
135
The struggle continues
186
The Harlem Renaissance
214
The Great Depression and federal theatre
307
Creeping toward integration
335
From Hans berry to Shange
375
The millennium
430
theatre scholarship 2002
482
Notes
488
Bibliography
547
Index
565

Educational theatre
255
The Caribbean connect1on
273

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About the author (2003)

Professor Emeritus, Theatre Department, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire.

Professor Emeritus in the Graduate Theatre Program at the City University of New York.

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