A History of Irish Farming, 1750-1950

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Four Courts Press, 2008 - History - 344 pages
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This book deals with changing methods of crop and livestock production during the 'Age of Improvement' in Ireland, and some of the ways in which they shaped rural society and the landscape. Irish agricultural improvers were part of an international exchange of ideas that led to the development of many new implements, crop varieties and breeds of livestock. However, at the level of small farm production, there was also a persistence of ancient techniques, some of which have been used since prehistoric times. These techniques were often condemned by contemporary observers, but modern research and fieldwork shows that they were most remarkable for their refinement and effectiveness. The book shows the rationality of Irish farmers, in developing systems and techniques that fitted their resources, or lack of them, making Ireland a major agricultural producer, and overcoming huge environmental and social obstacles to ensure the survival of millions of people.

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Contents

List of Illustrations
9
Introduction
13
Rural Society and Farming Methods 5
15
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Jonathan Bell is a writer and freelance journalist. His books include 'Carchitecture' (August, 2001), 'The Transformable House' (Architectural Design, 2000) and 'Concept Cars' (RotoVision, 2003). He writes regularly for Blueprint, Wallpaper and Grafik, and is also the co-editor of things, a journal of writing about objects and their histories. He is married and lives in London.

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