A History of Italian Law, Volume 1

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Beard Books, Oct 1, 2001 - History - 500 pages
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This work in two volumes presents a comprehensive analysis of the history of Italian law, which in a sense has become the law of Europe because of the reception of Roman law in varying degrees in all parts of Western Europe. The Roman Empire was a high tide in the cultural advancement of Western Europe. This influence can still be found in various codes in Europe. Thus, the history of the laws and customs of Italy involving the Holy Roman Empire and the feudal system with which it is associated, the Civil Law, the Church and Canon Law, and the law of merchants also reflects the development of European legal ideas and institutions. Fascinating reading for those interested in comparative law.
 

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Contents

V
3
VI
9
VII
10
VIII
12
IX
13
X
15
XI
16
XII
18
CXXXII
245
CXXXIII
246
CXXXIV
248
CXXXV
249
CXXXVI
250
CXXXVII
251
CXXXVIII
253
CXXXIX
254

XIII
20
XIV
21
XV
23
XVI
24
XVII
26
XVIII
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XIX
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XX
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XXI
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XXII
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XXIII
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XXIV
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XXV
43
XXVI
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XXVII
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XXVIII
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XXIX
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XXX
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XXXI
53
XXXII
55
XXXIII
56
XXXIV
58
XXXV
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XXXVI
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XXXVII
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XXXIX
67
XL
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XLI
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XLII
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XLIII
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XLIV
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XLV
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XLVI
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XLVII
87
XLVIII
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XLIX
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L
91
LI
93
LII
95
LIII
97
LIV
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LV
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LVI
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LVII
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LVIII
103
LIX
106
LX
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LXI
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LXII
109
LXIV
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LXV
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LXVI
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LXVII
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LXVIII
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LXIX
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LXX
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LXXI
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LXXII
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LXXIII
122
LXXIV
123
LXXV
127
LXXVI
128
LXXVII
130
LXXVIII
132
LXXIX
133
LXXX
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LXXXI
136
LXXXII
139
LXXXIII
141
LXXXIV
143
LXXXV
144
LXXXVI
145
LXXXVII
147
LXXXVIII
150
LXXXIX
152
XC
155
XCI
158
XCII
161
XCIII
165
XCIV
166
XCV
169
XCVI
170
XCVII
173
XCVIII
177
XCIX
180
C
182
CI
186
CII
188
CIII
191
CIV
192
CV
197
CVI
198
CVII
200
CVIII
201
CIX
203
CX
204
CXI
208
CXII
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CXIII
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CXIV
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CXV
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CXVI
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CXVII
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CXVIII
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CXIX
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CXX
228
CXXI
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CXXII
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CXXIII
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CXXIV
234
CXXV
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CXXVI
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CXXVII
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CXXVIII
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CXXIX
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CXXX
243
CXXXI
244
CXL
256
CXLI
258
CXLII
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CXLIII
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CXLIV
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CXLV
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CXLVI
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CXLVII
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CXLVIII
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CXLIX
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CL
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CLI
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CLII
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CLIII
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CLIV
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CLV
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CLVI
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CLVII
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CLVIII
286
CLIX
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CLX
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CLXI
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CLXII
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CLXIII
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CLXIV
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CLXV
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CLXVI
297
CLXVII
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CLXVIII
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CLXIX
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CLXX
304
CLXXI
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CLXXII
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CLXXIII
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CLXXIV
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CLXXV
310
CLXXVI
311
CLXXVII
313
CLXXVIII
316
CLXXIX
319
CLXXX
320
CLXXXI
322
CLXXXII
323
CLXXXIII
325
CLXXXIV
326
CLXXXV
327
CLXXXVI
329
CLXXXVII
330
CLXXXVIII
331
CLXXXIX
333
CXC
334
CXCI
335
CXCII
337
CXCIII
338
CXCIV
340
CXCV
341
CXCVI
343
CXCVII
344
CXCVIII
346
CXCIX
351
CC
352
CCI
354
CCII
356
CCIII
357
CCIV
359
CCV
361
CCVI
362
CCVII
363
CCVIII
364
CCX
365
CCXI
368
CCXII
369
CCXIII
370
CCXIV
373
CCXV
374
CCXVI
375
CCXVII
376
CCXVIII
378
CCXIX
380
CCXX
382
CCXXI
384
CCXXII
386
CCXXIII
387
CCXXIV
388
CCXXV
389
CCXXVI
391
CCXXVII
393
CCXXVIII
396
CCXXIX
398
CCXXX
400
CCXXXI
403
CCXXXIII
404
CCXXXIV
405
CCXXXV
406
CCXXXVI
408
CCXXXVII
410
CCXXXVIII
411
CCXXXIX
413
CCXL
415
CCXLI
416
CCXLII
419
CCXLIII
420
CCXLIV
423
CCXLV
426
CCXLVI
428
CCXLVII
429
CCXLVIII
430
CCXLIX
432
CCL
434
CCLII
437
CCLIII
439
CCLIV
441
CCLV
442
CCLVI
443
CCLVII
445
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Page xlvii - Is it possible to extend a higher civilization to the lower classes without debasing its standard and diluting its quality to the vanishing point? Is not every civilization bound to decay as soon as it begins to penetrate the masses ? " This book is a contribution of the greatest importance to the study of the Roman Empire.
Page 445 - Furtum est contrectatio rei fraudolosa lucri faciendi gratia vel ipsius rei vel etiam usus eius possessionisve : quod lege naturali prohibitum est admittere
Page 418 - Deo amabiles locorum episcopos jubemus per unam cujusque hebdomadse diem, eos qui in custodia habentur visitare, et diligenter inquirere causam ob quam detinentur, et sive servi sint, sive liberi, sive pro pecuniis, sive pro...
Page xlv - The first requisite is certainly a sound knowledge of legal history, and (which necessarily results from it) the confirmed habit of viewing every notion and every doctrine in its proper historical light.
Page lix - Storia del diritto italiano dalla caduta dell' impero romano alia codificazione ", 6 vols., 2d ed.
Page xlvii - Iebus, terribilis de occidente rumor adfertur obsideri Romam et auro salutem civium redimi spoliatosque rursum circumdari, ut post substantiam vitam quoque amitterent. Haeret vox et singultUs intercipiunt verba dictantis. Capitur urbs, quae totum cepit orbem, immo fame perit ante quam gladio et vix pauci, qui caperentur, inventi sunt. Ad nefandos cibos erupit esurientium rabies et sua invicem membra laniarunt, dum mater non parcit lactanti infantiae et recipit utero, quem paulo ante effuderat.
Page 406 - From what has been said, it should not be inferred that the courts will hesitate to overrule the actions of a school board.
Page 51 - Frankish counts and equally powerful bishops was a favorable territory after weak national kings had supplanted the Carlovingian dynasty. In central Italy a stronger government, the Church and the communes, gave less opportunity of development to the fief and made it more purely a right of property and less a politico-military institution.

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