A History of Italian Law, Volume 2

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Beard Books, Oct 1, 2001 - History - 384 pages
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This work in two volumes presents a comprehensive analysis of the history of Italian law, which in a sense has become the law of Europe because of the reception of Roman law in varying degrees in all parts of Western Europe. The Roman Empire was a high tide in the cultural advancement of Western Europe. This influence can still be found in various codes in Europe. Thus, the history of the laws and customs of Italy involving the Holy Roman Empire and the feudal system with which it is associated, the Civil Law, the Church and Canon Law, and the law of merchants also reflects the development of European legal ideas and institutions. Fascinating reading for those interested in comparative law.
 

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Contents

I
451
II
455
III
470
IV
477
V
495
VI
496
VII
499
VIII
517
XXIII
635
XXIV
638
XXV
647
XXVI
653
XXVII
656
XXVIII
665
XXIX
674
XXX
692

IX
528
X
533
XI
537
XII
555
XIII
561
XIV
566
XV
569
XVI
587
XVII
598
XVIII
605
XIX
611
XX
614
XXI
617
XXII
627
XXXI
711
XXXII
717
XXXIII
721
XXXIV
731
XXXV
736
XXXVI
741
XXXVII
751
XXXVIII
753
XXXIX
763
XL
771
XLI
782
XLII
791
XLIII
799
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Page 462 - Dei delitti e delle pene, apparsa anonima a Livorno nel 1764. Per quanto riguarda le riflessioni sviluppatesi all'interno dello Stato della Chiesa v. [A. GIUDICI], Apologia della giurisprudenza romana o note critiche al libro intitolato Dei delitti, e delle pene, Milano, Presso Giuseppe Galeazzi Regio stampatore, 1784; FM RENAZZI, Elementa juris criminalis, Romae, Ex Typographia Salomoniana, 1773-1781, 4 voli.
Page 488 - an offence against the fundamental altruistic sentiments of pity and probity in the average measure possessed by a given social group.
Page 460 - ... which produces no more than a momentary and counterfeit obedience. 42. CONCLUSION FROM all I have written a very useful theorem may be deduced, little though it conforms to custom, that common lawgiver of the nations. It is this : In order that punishment should never be an act of violence committed by one or many against a private citizen, it is essential that it be public, speedy, and necessary, as little as the circumstances will allow, proportionate to the crime, and established by law.
Page 452 - The State did not exist for the citizen, but the citizen for the State...

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