A History of Modern Chinese Fiction

Front Cover
Indiana University Press, 1999 - Literary Criticism - 726 pages
First published in 1961, and reissued in new editions several times, this is the pioneering, classic study of 20th-century Chinese fiction. The book covers some 60 years, from the Literary Revolution of 1917 through the Cultural Revolution of 1966-76. C. T. Hsia, Prof. Emeritus of Chinese at Columbia Univ., examines the major writers from Lu Hsun to Eileen Chang and representative works since 1949 from both mainland China and Taiwan. The first serious study of modern Chinese fiction in English, this book is also the best study of its subject available. Not only the specialist, but every reader who is interested in China or in literature will find it of interest. Hsia's astute insights and graceful writing make the book enjoyable as well as deeply edifying.
 

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Contents

Introduction by David Derwei Wang m vii
xxxvii
The Literary Revolution
3
Lu Hsün
28
The Literary Association Yeh Shaochun
55
The Creation Society Yü Tafu
93
Leftists and Independents
115
Mao Tun
140
Lao She
165
Wu Tsuhsiang
281
Conformity Defianc and Achievement
291
The Veteran Writers Mao Tun Shen
350
Eileen Chang
389
Chien Chungshu
432
Shih To
461
Conclusion 496
11
Communist Literature Since 1958 509
6

Shen Tsungwen
189
Chang Tieni
212
tzu Ting Ling Hsiao Chūn
257

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About the author (1999)

C. T. Hsia is the author of several important books on Chinese literature. He has been widely influential among Chinese readers and has influenced two generations of English-speaking scholars. He retired from teaching in 1991 and is Professor Emeritus of Chinese at Columbia University.

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