A History of South African Literature

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Cambridge University Press, Nov 18, 2004 - Literary Criticism
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This book is a critical study of South African literature, from colonial and pre-colonial times onwards. Christopher Heywood discusses selected poems, plays and prose works in five literary traditions: Khoisan, Nguni-Sotho, Afrikaans, English, and Indian. The discussion includes over 100 authors and selected works, including poets from Mqhayi, Marais and Campbell to Butler, Serote and Krog, theatre writers from Boniface and Black to Fugard and Mda, and fiction writers from Schreiner and Plaatje to Bessie Head and the Nobel prizewinners Gordimer and Coetzee. The literature is explored in the setting of crises leading to the formation of modern South Africa, notably the rise and fall of the Emperor Shaka's Zulu kingdom, the Colenso crisis, industrialisation, the colonial and post-colonial wars of 1899, 1914, and 1939, and the dissolution of apartheid society. In Heywood's study, South African literature emerges as among the great literatures of the modern world.
 

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Contents

Introduction communities and rites of passage
1
Poetry before Sharpeville singing protest writing
29
Theatre before Fugard
72
Prose classics Schreiner to Mofolo
87
Fiction of resistance and protest Bosman to Mphahlele
111
Poetry after Sharpeville
145
Theatre Fugard to Mda
178
Novels and stones after 1960
194
Notes
236
Glossary
250
Select bibliography
254
Index
287
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