A History of Texas and Texans, Volume 2

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American Historical Society, 1914 - Texas - 2672 pages
 

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Page 1005 - Family parties, including the grandmother and the little negroes, came from all the plantations and farms within reach, and little ones were held up high to get their share of warning. The Mexicans looked on imperturbable. San Antonio, excluding Galveston,* is much the largest city of Texas. After the Revolution, it was half deserted by its Mexican population, who did not care to come under Anglo-Saxon rule. Since then its growth has been rapid and steady. At the census of 1850, it numbered 3,500;...
Page 723 - President's house, accompanied by the secretary of the navy, and as soon as we rose above the bank, we saw before us a level of far-extending prairie, destitute of timber, and rather poor soil. Houses half finished, and most of them without roofs, tents, and a liberty pole, with the capitol, were all exhibited to our view at once. We approached the President's mansion, however, wading through water above our ankles. This abode of President Houston is a small loghouse, consisting of two rooms, and...
Page 798 - In Comal, Gillespie and Medina Counties, nearly all the inhabitants are Germans. In Victoria and Colorado Counties they constitute about three-fourths of the population ; in Calhoun, Bastrop and Bexar (excluding San Antonio) about one-half; in Fayette, Caldwell, Travis and San Antonio City about one-third, and m * Census of 1850.
Page 1026 - Inrge dark live-oaks. The people seem to have been very successful in their venture, to judge by various little improvements they are making and the comforts they have accumulated.
Page 1025 - Castroville — a village containing a colony of Alsatians, who are proud here to call themselves Germans, but who speak French, or a mixture of French and German. The cottages are scattered prettily, and there are two churches — the whole aspect being as far from Texan as possible. It might sit for the portrait of one of the poorer villages of the upper Rhone valley. Perhaps the most remarkable thing is the hotel, by M. Tarde, a two-story house, with double galleries, and the best inn we saw in...
Page 1026 - D'Hanis in 1854 as a most singular spectacle upon the verge of the great American wilderness. It is like one of the smallest and meanest of European peasant hamlets. There are about twenty cottages and hovels, all built in much the same style, the walls being made of poles and logs placed together vertically and made tight with clay mortar, the floors of beaten earth, the windows without glass...
Page 1006 - ... that is Mexican. Daylight walks about the town yielded little more to curiosity. The contrast of nationalities remained the chief interest. The local business is considerable, but carried on without subdivision of occupation. Each of a dozen stores offers all the articles you may ask for. A druggist or two, a saddler or two, a watchmaker and a gunsmith ply almost the only distinct trades. The country supplied from this centre is extensive, but very thinly settled. The capital owned here is quite...
Page 1006 - The Alamo was one of the earliest of these establishments. It is now within the town, and in extent, probably, a mere wreck of its former grandeur. It consists of a few irregular stuccoed buildings huddled against the old church, in a large court surrounded by a rude wall; the whole used as an arsenal by the US quartermaster. The church-door opens on the square and is meagerly decorated by stucco mouldings, all hacked and battered in the battles it has seen. Since the heroic defense of Travis and...
Page 677 - The completed portion of the road is in constant use. The remarkable fact may be stated that this five miles of road — terminating in the open prairie at a point remote from any settlement or public highway — has not only been of vast service to the people of western Texas, but has actually over paid running expenses.
Page 1005 - ... of Texas. After the Revolution, it was half deserted by its Mexican population, who did not care to come under Anglo-Saxon rule. Since then its growth has been rapid and steady. At the census of 1850, it numbered 3,500; in 1853, its population was 6,000; and in 1856, it is estimated at 10,500. Of these, about 4,000 are Mexicans, 3,000 Germans, and 3,500 Americans. The money-capital is in the hands of the Americans, as well as the officers and the Government. Most of the mechanics and the smaller...

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