A History of a Voyage to the Coast of Africa, and Travels Into the Interior of that Country: Containing Particular Descriptions of the Climate and Inhabitants, and Interesting Particulars Concerning the Slave Trade

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author, 1797 - 179 Seiten
 

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Seite 117 - The difference of color cannot arise from the intercourse of whites and blacks, for the whites are very rarely among them, and the result of this union is well known to be the yellow color, or mulatto. Many of the natives assert that they are produced by the women being debauched in the woods by the large baboon, ourangoutang, and by that species in particular called the guaga mooroos.
Seite 117 - This artless traveller does not stop here. The idea of this peculiarity in the color and features of these people being a disease, and even its specific nature did not escape him, hence he adds: "These people rendered unfortunate by the prejudices of their countrymen, are born of black parents; they have all the features of other inhabitants, but differ from them only in the above circumstances. The difference of color cannot arise from the intercourse of whites and blacks, for the whites are very...
Seite 13 - ... their slaves cannot easily escape. The slaves are in those islands suffered to go at large, without chains, contrary to the customs on the continent. The surface of the islands is barren and rocky, but there is abundance of fine fresh water; and provisions are procured with facility. From the factors here we learned that the Ebo and Golo Kings had been at war, the latter of whom having been defeated, and a great part of his army had fallen into the hands of the conqueror, they therefore advised...
Seite 148 - ... my little finger from my hand; I know not how it was that I felt nothing of the severe pain for the moment, a slight twitch on the hand was the only sensation I experienced; the blow was broken that I had intended, but I renewed the effort, and with effect, for I levelled the fellow, and the sailor recovered his gun, whom I could not prevent from running the poor negro through the body; the hatch was open, and he fell among his fellows, who had, crowded, tied, and ironed as they were to assist...
Seite 116 - They go entirely naked; their skin is white, but has not that animated appearance so perceptible in Europeans. It has a dull deathlike whitish cast that conveys an idea more of sickness, than of health. Their hair is red, or ashes-coloured, yellowish wool, and their eyes are uniformly white, in that part by which others are distinguished into the black, grey and blue eyes. They are set deep in the head, and very commonly squint, for as their skin is deprived of the black mucous web, the...
Seite 16 - ... Ebo and Golo Kings had been at war, the latter of whom having been defeated, and a great part of his army had fallen into the hands of the conqueror, they therefore advised us to proceed ... to the Ebo nation. . . . On the 6th February we were visited by numbers of the natives, who offered to barter with us fruit and ivory for our hardwares; but finding after we had exchanged a few articles, that they belonged to a nation which had been before represented to us as thinly inhabited, and that we...
Seite 16 - ... of the natives, who offered to barter with us fruit and ivory for our hardwares; but finding after we had exchanged a few articles, that they belonged to a nation which had been before represented to us as thinly inhabited, and that we could not accommodate ourselves here as we wished, we made use of them to obtain information concerning the country of the Ebo king. We fortunately found an interpreter acquainted with that country and the trade, him we engaged, and an expedition was immediately...
Seite 149 - ... of the sailors were considerably, but not dangerously hurt, and of the slaves, those who had been riotous above and below, nine were severely wounded. We reached the ship in five days from our first embarkation, where we were received with much satisfaction; the officers had all provided themselves with three or four wives each, and rebuked me for not bringing mine along, alledging that they would, according to the account given by their messmates, bring a good price when we arrived in America.

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