A History of the County Court, 1846–1971

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Cambridge University Press, Nov 4, 1999 - Law
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This 1999 book was the first full-length account of the county court, which in contemporary English life has become the main forum for most civil disputes. It began as the 'poor man's court', largely concerned with the pursuit of working-class debtors; but, as this book shows, it has expanded far beyond its origins as an agency `for the more easy recovery of small debts' and now includes in its jurisdiction a diverse range of matters, including housing, accidents and consumer goods. Drawing on a wide range of sources, the author traces the history of the county court from its creation in 1846 through to the reconstruction of the court system in 1971. He describes its organisation and officers, from judges to bailiffs, and discusses the roles of judges, practising lawyers and lay persons. The text is an intriguing engagement with themes including access to justice.
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
1 THE MAKING OF THE NEW COUNTY COURTS
5
2 AN AGE OF EXPANSION 18471870
38
3 AN AGE OF FRUSTRATION 18711914
74
4 WAR TO WAR
111
5 PATCHING UP THE COURTS
153
6 CENTRAL ORGANISATION AND FINANCES
198
7 JUDGES
240
8 STAFF AND BUILDINGS
281
APPENDIX 1 THE MAYORS AND CITY OF LONDON COURTS
322
APPENDIX 2 COUNTY COURT TOWNS 18471971
326
APPENDIX 3 STATISTICAL TABLES
333
BIBLIOGRAPHY
359
INDEX
388
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