A History of the Schools of Cincinnati

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School life Company, 1902 - Education - 608 pages
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Page 287 - In the common schools in cities of the first and second class, and in all educational institutions supported wholly or in part by money received from the State ; and it shall be the duty of boards of education of cities of the first and second class, and...
Page 443 - Resolved — That religious instruction, and the reading of religious books, including the Holy Bible, are prohibited in the common schools of Cincinnati, it being the true object and intention of this rule to allow the children of the parents of all sects and opinions in matters of faith and worship to enjoy alike the benefit of the Common School Fund.
Page 481 - Europe, such facts and information as he mav deem useful to the State in relation to the various systems of public instruction and education which have been adopted in the several countries through which he may pass, and make report thereof with such practical observations as he may think proper to the next General Assembly.
Page 443 - Resolved, That so much of the regulations on the course of study and text-books in the intermediate and district schools (page 213, annual report), as reads as follows: 'The opening exercises in every department shall commence by reading a portion of the Bible by or under the direction of the teacher, and appropriate singing by the pupils,
Page 442 - In the year 1840 it was transferred by the Most Rev. Archbishop JB Purcell, DD, to the fathers of the Society of Jesus, who have conducted it ever since under the title first mentioned.. It was incorporated by the general assembly of the State in 1842. In 1869 an act was passed which secures to the institution a perpetual charter and all the privileges usually granted to universities. The course of study embraces the doctrine and evidences of the Catholic religion, logic, metaphysics, ethics, astronomy,...
Page 216 - ... receive the benefit of a sound, thorough and practical English education, and such as might fit them for the active duties of life, as well as instruction in the higher branches of knowledge, except denominational theology, to the extent that the same are now or may hereafter be taught in any of the secular colleges or universities of the highest grade in the country, I feel grateful to God that through his kind providence I have been sufficiently favored to gratify the wish of my heart.
Page 444 - The entire government of public schools in which Catholic youth are educated cannot be given over to the civil power. We as Catholics cannot approve of that system of education for youth which is apart from instruction in the Catholic faith and the teaching of the Church.
Page 446 - Legal Christianity is a solecism, a contradiction of terms. When Christianity asks the aid of government beyond mere impartial protection, it denies itself. Its laws are divine, and not human. Its essential interests lie beyond the reach and range of human governments. United with government, religion never rises above the merest superstition; united with religion, government never rises above the merest despotism; and all history shows us that the more widely and completely they are separated, the...
Page 287 - ... schools in cities of the first and second class, and in all educational institutions supported wholly or in part by money received from the state; and it shall be the duty of boards of education of cities of the first and second class, and boards of such educational institutions, to make provision in the schools and institutions under their jurisdiction for the teaching of physical culture and calisthenics, and to adopt such methods as shall adapt the same to the capacity of the pupils in the...
Page 422 - The object of the charity is reformation, by training its inmates to industry; by imbuing their minds with principles of morality and religion; by furnishing them with means to earn a living; and, above all, by separating them from the corrupting influence of improper associates.

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