A History of the University of South Carolina

Front Cover
State Company, 1916 - 475 pages
The present volume covers the life of the institution from Governor Drayton's message in 1801 to the resignation of President Mitchell in 1913. The minutes of the board of trustees and of the faculty have been consulted on all points. All other material that could throw light on any phase of the University's life has been examined. - Preface.
 

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Page 6 - ... and by that name shall have succession, and they and their successors shall and may forever thereafter by the same name be able and capable in law to sue and be sued, implead and be impleaded, answer and be answered unto, defend and be defended in all courts of...
Page 4 - America ; and that, by the same name, they and their successors shall and may have perpetual succession, and shall and may be persons able and capable, in the law, to...
Page 4 - College ;" and that by the said name they and their successors shall and may have perpetual succession, and be able and capable in law to have, receive, and enjoy, to them and their successors, lands, tenements and hereditaments, of any kind or value, in fee, or for life or years, and personal property of any kind whatsoever, and also all sums of money of any amount whatsoever, which may be granted or bequeathed to them for the purpose of building, erecting, endowing and supporting the said college...
Page 5 - College," which Faculty shall have the power of enforcing the rules and regulations adopted by the Trustees for the government of the pupils, by rewarding or censuring them, and, finally, by suspending such of them as after repeated admonitions shall continue disobedient and refractory, until a determination of a quorum of the Trustees can be had...
Page 327 - Every Student in College, holds himself bound to conceal any offence against the Laws of the Land as well as the Laws of the College...
Page 236 - was given, each started to raise his pistol; but each had on a frockcoat, and the flap of Roach's coat caught on his arm, and prevented his pistol from rising. "When Adams saw that, he lowered his pistol to the ground. The word was then given a second time : " Are you ready ? Fire ! One ! " They both shot simultaneously ; Dr. Nott said it was impossible to tell which was before the other. Adams was shot through the pelvis, and he lingered a few hours and died in great agony. Roach was shot through...
Page 6 - And be it enacted by the authority aforesaid, That this Act shall be deemed a public Act, and as such shall be judicially taken notice of, without special pleading, in all the courts of law or equity within this State.
Page 4 - Whereas, the proper education of youth contributes greatly to the prosperity of society, and ought always to be an object of legislative, attention; and whereas, the establishment of a college in a central part of the State, where all its youth may be educated, will highly promote the instruction, the good order, and the harmony of the whole community.
Page 236 - What can I do to insult you?" Adams replied, "This is enough, sir, and you will hear from me." Adams immediately went to his room and sent a challenge to Roach. It was promptly accepted, and each went up town and selected seconds and advisers. And now comes the strange part of this whole affair : No less a person than General Pierce M. Butler, distinguished in the Mexican war as the colonel of the Palmetto regiment, and who became Governor of South Carolina, agreed to act as second to one of these...
Page 311 - That part of the work i~- which is done is in a handsome, though not all in'a durable stile. The chapel occupies the two lower stories of the central building on the right, and is in a beautiful style of workmanship both within and Without. The Library room above is supported by four stately Tuscan columns, which rise from the area of the chapel with considerable majesty, and give to the room an appearance of grandeur. The galleries are supported by a row of smaller pillars. The- room is nearly or...

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