A Horse's Tale

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Harper & Brothers, 1906 - American fiction - 152 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
12
III
19
IV
25
V
33
VI
56
VII
82
VIII
88
IX
90
X
100
XI
116
XII
129
XIII
133
XIV
145
XVI
149
Copyright

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Page viii - Sylvia, by Delibes. When that master was composing it he did not know it was a bugle-call, it was I that found it out. Along through the book I have distributed a few anachronisms and unborn historical incidents and such things, so as to help the tale over the difficult places. This idea is not original with me ; I got it out of Herodotus. Herodotus says, "Very few things happen at the right time, and the rest do not happen at all: the conscientious historian will correct these defects.
Page 80 - em up, I can't get 'em up, I can't get 'em up in the morning...
Page 129 - Well, it is perfectly grand, Antonio, perfectly beautiful. Burning a nigger don't begin." XII MONGREL AND THE OTHER HORSE )AGE-BRUSH, you have I been listening?" "Yes." " Isn't it strange ?" "Well, no, Mongrel, I don't know that it is." "Why don't you?" "I've seen a good many human beings in my time. They are created as they are; they cannot help it. They are only brutal because that is their make ; brutes would be brutal if it was their make.
Page 6 - Then he goes to sleep. He knows he can trust me, because I have a reputation. A scout horse that has a reputation does not play with it. My mother was all American—no alkali-spider about her, I can tell you; she was of the best blood of Kentucky, the bluest Blue-grass aristocracy, very proud and acrimonious—or maybe it is ceremonious. I don't know which it is. But it is no matter; size is the main thing about a word, and that one's up to standard. She spent her military life as colonel of the...
Page 1 - AM Buffalo Bill's horse. I have spent my life under his saddle — with him in it, too, and he is good for two hundred pounds, without his clothes ; and there is no telling how much he does weigh when he is out on the war-path and has his batteries belted on.
Page 3 - ... me going like the wind and his hair streaming out behind from the shelter of his broad slouch. Yes, he is a sight to look at then — and I'm part of it myself. I am his favorite horse, out of dozens. Big as he is, I have carried him eighty-one miles between nightfall and sunrise on the scout; and I am good for fifty, day in and day out, and all the time. I am not large, but I am built on a business basis. I have carried him thousands and thousands of miles on scout duty for the army, and there's...

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