A House Is Not a Home: A B-Boy Blues Novel

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Harper Collins, May 24, 2005 - Fiction - 232 pages
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In the sixth and final title of his groundbreaking, bestselling B-Boy Blues series, James Earl Hardy brings his beloved couple -- Mitchell, the Buppie from Brooklyn, and Raheim, the homeboy from Harlem -- into the twenty-first century.

As they prepare for the birthday party of Raheim's fifteen-year-old son, Errol (formerly known as "Junior" and "Li'l Brotha Man"), Mitchell and Raheim both juggle their own midlife crises and consider once-in-a-lifetime opportunities.

With the Big 4-0 just three years away, Mitchell is a little antsy: He has a very successful freelance writing career, but he longs for something more. And that something more finds him -- a dream job from a most unlikely place. But he's gotten very comfortable working his own schedule and being a stay-at-home dad -- does he really want to return to the daily grind of punching a time clock again?

Raheim has just officially entered his thirties -- and, unfortunately, has the one gray hair to prove it. And after years of coming this close to getting roles won by the likes of Taye Diggs and Mekhi Phifer, he is finally offered the lead in a film that could make him a star. But will he do what no other Black actor has done before: play gay and come out in the process?

James Earl Hardy draws on the themes that put him on the map -- love, family, and high drama in tandem with media phenomena like same-sex marriage, the down-low, gay adoption, and homo thugs -- to create another vivid, vibrant, and saucy portrait of Black same-gender-loving (SGL) life and love.

 

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Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
11
Section 3
27
Section 4
33
Section 5
38
Section 6
55
Section 7
70
Section 8
77
Section 11
105
Section 12
113
Section 13
124
Section 14
148
Section 15
156
Section 16
179
Section 17
183
Section 18
187

Section 9
97
Section 10
101
Section 19
229
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

James Earl Hardy has written for Essence, Newsweek, Entertainment Weekly, the Washington Post, the Advocate, and the Source. The recipient of many prestigious honors and awards, he lives in Atlanta, Georgia.

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