A Humanist Science: Values and Ideals in Social Inquiry

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Stanford University Press, Aug 8, 2008 - Philosophy - 176 pages
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Providing a capstone to Philip Selznick's influential body of scholarly work, A Humanist Science insightfully brings to light the value-centered nature of the social sciences. The work clearly challenges the supposed separation of fact and value, and argues that human values belong to the world of fact and are the source of the ideals that govern social and political institutions. By demonstrating the close connection between the social sciences and the humanities, Selznick reveals how the methods of the social sciences highlight and enrich the study of such values as well-being, prosperity, rationality, and self-government.

The book moves from the animating principles that make up the humanist tradition to the values that are central to the social sciences, analyzing the core teachings of these disciplines with respect to the moral issues at stake. Throughout the work, Selznick calls attention to the conditions that affect the emergence, realization, and decline of human values, offering a valuable resource for scholars and students of law, sociology, political science, and philosophy.
 

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Contents

The Humanist Tradition
3
The Postulate of Humanity
17
Four Pillars of Humanist Science
31
From Social Order to Moral Order
45
Humanist Virtues
59
The Morality of Governance
71
Rationality and Responsibility
83
The Quality of Culture
93
Law and Justice
105
Moral Philosophy and Social Science
119
A Public Philosophy
129
Notes
139
Index
145
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About the author (2008)

Philip Selznick is Professor Emeritus of Law and Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. In 2003, Professor Selznick received the Law & Society Association's Kalven prize, which recognizes a body of scholarly work that has contributed to the advancement of research in law and society.

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