A Judeo-Islamic Nation: The Evolution of America's Political Theology

Front Cover
Hillcrest Publishing Group, 2011 - History - 246 pages
0 Reviews
What religion do American "Christians" really believe in?

Since the 4th century AD, true-to-the-Gospel Christianity has been a scarce commodity. Believers have always desired a religion more practical than the one in the Book - so much so that among politically active believers, Christianity long ago morphed into a religion more in line with the basic themes of Judaism and Islam (land, prosperity, justice, self-governance, and self-defense) than with the passive fatalism of Jesus and Paul. And since its beginnings in colonial New England, the American version of this Judeo-Islamic faith has continued to evolve, being reshaped time and again by the forces of history, national character, and even by advances in technology.

A Judeo-Islamic Nation presents a new kind of religious criticism. Written by a scientist and nonbeliever, it presents an analysis intended not to defeat or marginalize religion, but simply to emphasize its human, evolving nature. A Judeo-Islamic Nation was written to stimulate a richer, more productive conversation between believers and nonbelievers, and between American Christians and Muslims.

"This is a thoughtful examination of the role of religion in American public life. It shows how recent trends challenge both the traditional notion that religion is a private matter as well as the notion of a civil religion that unites everyone in the faith of Americanism."
-Mark Juergensmeyer, Professor of Sociology, University of California, Santa Barbara, author of Global Rebellion: Religious Challenges to the Secular State

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Preface
1
Two The Good Book
27
Three The Politics of Predestination
53
Four God Goes West
71
Five The Founders
93
Six Exceptionalism
117
Seven Crusades
139
Eight Wednesdays Child
165
Nine Science Technology and Religion
183
Ten Religion War and Culture
203
Notes
233
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information